Jens' Yamaha trumpet rant

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetjens, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. chrisvenditti

    chrisvenditti New Friend

    25
    0
    Aug 17, 2005
    Let me clarify what I mean. We all have heard a lot of stuff about breathing. Some of it is good, some of it is bad. There are a lot of "breathing techniques" out there.

    In Alexander Technique you learn to align your body and use it correctly. When this happens, your best breath follows as a natural consequence. It has done wonders for my playing.

    Cheers,
    Chris
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Arnold Jacobs 10 cents is well documented in his book "Song and Wind". Recommended reading for all!

    Like with hardware, there is no universal method for success (even although many teachers claim such nonsense). Our psychological makeup, flexibility, marital status, playing schedule, probably even our exposure to the sun, alcohol and artificial sweeteners all have a very big say in what options that we have.
    There is a bit of truth in all "religions" and finding the right one probably requires more humility than talent - humility to acknowledge that we are not close to perfect and to drop the barriers to let someone help very intimately. After that we need the willingness to invest in a future that MAY be better. You will only really know when you are well on the road to getting there.
     
  3. derekkress

    derekkress Pianissimo User

    172
    0
    Oct 8, 2007
    Montreal Qc Canada
    One needs to keep an open mind and analyze the pros and cons of all technical aspects of playing the trumpet.Eventually we make individual choices hopefully carefully guided by a great mentor.I've always used the golf analogy, different swings for different folks but always the same goal.In the end we are trying to make the best music possible, to entertain!My marital status is great and my blood sugar excellent!My exposure to sun sucks right now thanks to living in the Great White North. Off to Cuba to jam!
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2007
  4. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

    488
    3
    Feb 6, 2007
    I've never really had a problem with breathing...although sometimes I do have to remind myself-
    In, Out- repeat.
    :D
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The problem is normally not during the in or out, it is between them. A perfectly smooth transition without added throat or body tension needs to be practiced too! It is amazing how "forcefully" many players breathe in thinking that they can take more air in faster. The tension may increase the speed, but decreases the volume available. Then the really hard part comes, let go of that tension to play relaxed...............
     
  6. derekkress

    derekkress Pianissimo User

    172
    0
    Oct 8, 2007
    Montreal Qc Canada
    No offence to anyone but sometimes you just have to think like Miles as he said to Sanborn(not shown here in this clip,I remember this when Sanborn tried to talk shop with him as I watched the show that evening) "Just shut up and play!"YouTube - Miles Davis - Hannibal
     
  7. brassmojo

    brassmojo Pianissimo User

    79
    0
    Nov 22, 2007
    No matter how you praise it, glorify it and admire their designers and endorsers, it's still a Yamaha. Great players will sound great on a garden hose.
    Buy something that's tried and tested. If you use the top five American made horns and still sound OK...it's not the horn.

    3 cents
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,460
    7,037
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    One advantage to larger mouthpieces is that they can make a shorter instrument sound longer than it really is. In the orchestra, "ur-old-school" trumpeters, used to the old (long, like mellophone length) trumpet in f complained about the lack of nobility (read "wimpy") sound of the Bb trumpet.

    Modern Bb and C (piston) trumpets, and higher (all) don't really blend all that well with the rest of the orchestral brass (in my light-years from humble Vulgano opinion). This isn't a bad thing, it just is, and groups like the London Brass use a flugelhorn to bridge the gap between trumpet and trombone, because (iml-yfhV opinion) the modern piston Bb is built to get the sound guys like Vizzzutti get! We often want it to sound more like a rotary-valved trumpet or cornet, however, and bigger, deeper mouthpieces allow us to "cheat" a bit in the orchestra, albeit at a price.

    Weird stuff, but true. I think. I'll wait for some sparks....
     
  9. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

    1,832
    166
    Jul 18, 2006
    Casper, WY
    Jerry, you sold me! Thanks for the post.

    Side thought: wouldn't it be something if we see flugel's in orchestras more in 25 to 50 years? Sergei might have set the ball rolling already and we don't know it.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Jerry, no sparks, you are exactly right. The over-brilliance of the piston trumpet is compensated by the big mouthpiece. In addition, the "monster sound" required to get jobs has changed how composers view the trumpets position in the orchestra. The FFF and FFFs of Tschaikovsky, Wagner, Mahler are simply not reasonable anymore. That sound marking the edge of what the trumpet can acoustically produce is sooooo loud that it is no longer useful. This robs us of very significant colors. Some orchestras/trumpet sections use natural trumpets in Mozart and Beethoven to get some of this color back. This seems to have more success in Europe than in the states - maybe signs of Hollywoods grip on sound concept?
     

Share This Page