Joined the Super C brigade briefly

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Cornyandy, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    I have been in and out of the brigade. For a few months at a time, I work my way up to it and I use it for a concert/gig whatever I need then I decide it will be fine and then when I get a chart where a "Super C" is doable and its not there.
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I do have a shallow mouthpiece, don't know what it is there's no name on it. Its a simple "bucket" shape with a tube on the bottom, a wide cushiony rim and a dent in the top where the cup should be. It is fun but I woldn't use it out

    You mention a number of Shilke mouthpieces, are there any in the Stork range you would reccomend as I have a couple of deeper Storks that I like for classical work
    One other question You mention the sharp bite of the Wick, now it may be that because I play the cornet and am used to quite deep "bitey" mouthpieces but I don't find it noticably sharp.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    If I use embouchure # 657a/34d AND my JET-TONE CUSTOM MODEL 1B, yah, I can do that!! ROFL congrats Andy!!
     
  4. PINCHUNO

    PINCHUNO Piano User

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    Who hasn't thought that Arturo should maybe have tried a smaller piece for his high stuff. One thing is to play a 3c for soloing and looking for that big fat tone he gets. I don't care how high he plays. The 3c makes it sound a little strangled and stuffy over certain notes. Obviously he's a monster but I don't think in his high playing that the 3c is the right one.
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'll tell him next time I see him.
     
  6. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    I don't know the Stork system.

    However it is quite possible that sharp mouthpieces aren't a problem for you. Sometimes though for us receded jaw type players the inner rim edge or "bite" contacts our upper lip at its most severe angle. My guess (and its just a guess) is that you're playing with a more forward jaw chop setting. That your teeth at either even with each other or the lower teeth protrude a tad past the uppers. In fact I'd almost bet money on this. The fact that you're even getting Double C's at all is usually indicative of a forward jaw embouchure setting.

    If this is so you would most likely prefer a sharper inner rim edge. Though working shallower might be helpful. Maybe not. Don't know until you try.

    We see lots of even to forward jaw cats playing extreme register notes. They usually play with dry lips. Either both dry or one wet, one dry. Usually the tones they produce are soft at first because the forward jaw tends to trade volume for register. With proper analysis and work these players usually can get a bigger sound. That said it is often hard for them to cut through unamplified in a big band.

    We've got a forward jaw cat playing second in my big band who gets a pretty big sound above High C. Doesn't have a whole lot of harmonics but the volume is there. Creates a healthy level of competition in the section. I like to give him liberal amounts of my lead book just to hear him play. Keep him happy. And it saves my own chops during a three hour concert.
     
  7. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Thats an interesting post Local, I'm certainly not a receded jaw player an I'm probably even to forward and you'd win your bet. I don't conciously wet my lips before playing although I probably do keep them "not too dry" but I tend to moisten the mouthpiece. Thanks for the input pal. One thing I forgot to mention I'm not a DHC obsessed player but if its there I'm pleased
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    oh my gosh -- what is wrong with you Yorkshire peoples?? NOT OBSESSED with a DHC, oh wait a minute -- you did say you play cornet, didn't you??? I am sorry, I almost missed that point!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    Andy, For the sake of continuity with the American and the English trumpet players, I suggest that the Brits call it a BHC ( Bloody High C ).
     
  10. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    That sort of works but we are up against two problems. In Yorkshire we don't even like wasting letters (our thrift is legendary) and BHC is one letter longer than SC. The other is the unfortunate public foul language that is nearing epidemic proportions in this country whih could lead to more colourful HCs being discussed, its a the thin end of the wedge
     

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