Jon Faddis, "March That Thang"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by acarcido, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    While all you mention have been composed by Sousa, IMO you missed one of the three I expect the Editor of the Washington Post newspaper to know, and if he didn't maybe he should resign, and that is The Washington Post march. Yes, Sousa was very prolific and while I have his entire "book" I have not added them all to my personal repertoire and won't for personal reasons.

    It's a bit of Sousa trivia I picked up, but the USMC hymn as composed by Jacques Offenbach is an excerpt from his Orpheus In The Underworld from which we also get the excerpt of his Can Can. Too, when Offenbach was on his U.S. tour, Sousa played violin in his orchestra. The violin was Sousa's primary instrument, and reputedly he became a master of it with perfect pitch.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Interesting... Could this thread be in answer to Hmmmm?
     
  3. bachfella

    bachfella Mezzo Piano User

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    You're right, Ed Lee--How could I have missed the Washington Post March?? Perhaps because it's so obvious? (that's not a knock on you--The Washington Post March IS one you'd expect the Washington Post's editor to be familiar with!!) There's the Liberty Bell, too--the one that Monty Python's Flying Circus used as their theme music, and so many others, I've forgotten 'em!!
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I've been rebuked by a conductor who I highly respect with my multi brass rendition of Sabres and Spurs because I did not include the percussion of the horses' hoof steps. Too, having listened to a USAF band rendition (Langley AFB, if I remember right) rendition, I concur that such does much to put the "snazz" to it. However, since I am not a proficient percussionist, I just couldn't find it viable to record the hoof beats of a troop of horses and synchronize such to the music. Too, where would I now find a horseback mounted Army troop that could replicate such beat? None the less, I have enjoyed my present effort as accomplished in my comeback after a 40+ year hiatus.

    Among my Sousa favorites is High School Cadets that I first played on trumpet when I was in high school and re-played with multi-brass in my comeback. This introduces a bit more Sousa trivia, or his history, that he was directing the Gonzaga High School band in DC while concurrently directing the USMC band when he composed the song.


    Yeah, call me a Sousa addict, and I'll only respond with a "Thank You!" To this, I'll only say there is a very extended variance in music between what the OP of this thread presented and that which Sousa presented, and I for one much prefer the latter.
     
  5. bachfella

    bachfella Mezzo Piano User

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    Ed, I believe Sousa's father had him enlisted in the Marines when Sousa was a teenager. Might he have been 17?
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    According to the LOC bio John Philip Sousa enlisted in the USMC band at age 13 as a boy apprentice musician, yet served with them for 7 years making him age 20 when he left. His father was then a trombonist with the USMC band. He later rejoined the band as director an stayed with them for 12 years as their director bringing them to the renown that continues today, and then left to form his own band that became internationally renown. In WWI he was commissioned a Lt. Cmdr. in the Navy and directed the Navy Band at Great Lakes then formed a second band afterward. It was this second band, that Walter H. Cameron my public school instrumental music instructor, private tutor, and high school band director in Carnegie PA played cornet with from 1926-31 when Sousa became ill and gave up his own band. Having been invited as guest conductor of the Ringold Band, Sousa died in the Lincoln Hotel in Reading PA March 6, 1932.

    Mr. Cameron had then gone on to play with the Ringling Brothers Circus as was before that circus merged with the Barnum & Bailey Circus. Now you know how I come to play Entry of the Gladiators by Julius Fucik aka Grand March Chromatic the theme song of the clowns entering the circus ring. While I played it in high school on trumpet, I re-played it with multi-brass in my comeback. It was in my high school junior year that Mr. Cameron attained his Doctoral, but I am not certain if it was Pitt or then Carnegie Tech. In addition to performance, I was one of two student directors in both my junior year and senior years as put me on the spot to conduct the pit ensemble for many elementary school performances. Also, in my senior year I was field choreographer for several football half time shows, and how I still dislike the song Good Night Irene as got raves with the drama of a brass bed being set up and our drum majorette pretending to prepare to go to sleep ... and no, she did not undress but put an oversized piegnoir over her uniform. The announcer gave kudos to our wrestling team for the quick bed set-up and take down. The bed was donated and afterward raffled off earning our band over $300.00 ... big money in the 50s when gasoline was still cheaper than 3 dimes. Too, that was a time when there were still open metal bed springs instead of box springs. Ah, memories now when one gets old.
     
  7. bachfella

    bachfella Mezzo Piano User

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    Interesting Sousa stuff....as a brass player, of course, I've played his marches, but even as a college graduate with a music ed degree, I didn't (and really still don't) know much about the man himself. One thing people should learn in college is just how much they DON'T know!! Neat that your band director and private teacher played for him, Ed!!:-)
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Dr. Cameron often had melancholy in his eyes as he told me of his time playing with Sousa, particularly that contrary to what most think, the Sousa Band(s) did not perform much while marching as reputed to have been in parade only 7 times. To paraphrase Dr. Cameron, had Sousa not known his stuff, Dr. Cameron would have quit, and in reverse if a player didn't, s/he was let go. Needless to say (and I believe) is that Dr. Cameron thought Sousa was irascible and pompous, and a difficult director, but then he went on to say playing with Ringling Brothers circus was worse than a "chicken chase" and a challenge to maintain clean underwear inferring that he thought some other players didn't. Still, I must say that Dr. and Mrs. Cameron (Virginia) had a nice rapport with my family, my father establishing the accounting for the Band funds while then also teaching commercial subjects in high school. Very often my parents, my brothers and I were their dinner guests, and they ours. His wife was an accomplished floutist and pianist, and after dinner at our house she and my Mother would play duets and with our windows open in the summer, I observed many nearby neighbors across the street sitting on their front porches listening. Where Dr. Cameron got the patience and endurance to teach beginners in then 3 elementary schools and direct the band in high school and also tutor ( I wasn't the only one ) I still ponder. I also ponder the disposition of his French Besson cornet. Still, all I remember about his trumpet was that it was a Conn.

    Getting back to Sousa, it is alluded that he was paid only $1.00 per annum as a Lt. Commander while directing the Navy Band at Great Lakes during WWI, and it was at that time he composed his own Wedding March with then prejudice to such of Mendolsohn and from Lohengren. IMO opinion any couple that wants to get hitched with his needs psychiatric care, albeit it is great music ... yet too long. Geez, I don't know of any church with an aisle that long and I had lover's impatience when I got married. I'm also not overwhelmingly keen on his Picador March and though Dr. Cameron gave me the score, he wasn't either.

    I could recommend any who like Sousa music that they visit the Sousa Museum at the University of Illinois in Urbana IL.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
  9. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    Well, I think this thread should be renamed in Sousa's honor.:-)
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Really, I don't believe he would want anything to do with it. From what has been told to me, you play music the way Sousa wanted it played or you could pack up and leave
     

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