Jon Faddis, "March That Thang"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by acarcido, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    I take it that attitude was inherited from the discipline gained in the Marine Corp.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I don't think so, whereas in USMC if you wouldn't play the way he wanted to, all you'd be allowed to carry is a rifle and couldn't leave the Corp until your enlistment was completed or you were killed. I think this attitude of Sousa's may have been present only with his commercial bands, if indeed it was present at all. It is said he flipped the USMC band from rag tag to the renown it has continued to have today and while doing so, concurrenty directed the Gonzaga High School Band in D.C. as indicates to me he had enduring patience as well.

    More trivia: A painting of Sousa by Capolin now hangs in the foyer of the USMC Band Barracks in DC. I thought it odd that the USMC Band dressed for a D.C. performance in the Washington Navy Yard and rode the buses to the performance site standing and hanging on to the overhead rail so they wouldn't get wrinkles in their uniforms. I've seen them perform at a Scottish Game on a football field dressed in their red jackets with white trousers and shoes, march directly into a wet area of the field under a goal post, flip an about face and come away with what I've always known as a British half step and then break into a full step with peels of left and right face to broaden across the stadium field and then counter march as they played to audiences on both sides of the field. That and the Tattoos in the evening at the USMC Commander's home were inspiring to me, and something to write about to my oldest brother who served in the Corp, !st Marines, FMFPAC during WWII and personally survived without wounds.
     
  3. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    Ed, that is some amazing knowlege you have. I think you have awakend my historical appetite regarding Sousa and what a major influence he was. We as band member knew about him and the music he wrote, but never really focused on what he did and what influence he incurred on modern day bands.

    Semper Fidelis to your brother.

    I served in the Army (2nd Armor Division "Hell on Wheels", 82nd Airborne and 24th Infantry Division) myself. Motto: "This We'll Defend".

    Thanks for that Ed.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Although my brother Bob spent one enlistment in USMC and later went to college under the then GI Bill, they didn't have a Navy ROTC so he took the Army program and with many years tucked away as a Reserve Army Officer in the Quartermaster Corp resigned his commission. Today, at age 84, he is still very active in the Marine Corp League in WI and often performs the honor of volley salutes at veteran's funerals,
    especially Marines, with the Garand M1 I gave him.

    I served in USAF with SAC and TAC 8th & 5th AF respectively in reconnaissance and photo-mapping. Where all I've been and what all I did then, I'll never tell, but I did upgrade from enlisted to officer but too subsequently resigned my commission for domestic reasons that still ended in a divorce. I suppose a high point of my service was as USAF liason during the filming of the movie Sayonara starring Marlon Brando and Red Buttons with the 67th Tactical Reconnaisance Wing (TRW) in Japan, in the era of the Super Sabre Jet RF-86D, the "R' designating reconnaissance aircraft with no armament. Should you see the movie, you'd notice the "67th TRW" on the hangar in the background. The last I heard was the 67th was at Hickam AFB in Hawaii. SAC is no more, too. Also for a short time I was with HQ 7602nd Air Intelligence Group "Cum Silentio".

    All this is just memories for me now, some good, some bad, and some horrible.

    Back to Sousa, much of what I've said about him can be corroborated via Internet search, but my experience as close as I could be can't. I spent a considerable part of my life in the DC environs inclusive of where I met my present wife 46 years ago and got married to her a year later. Yes, I've been to Sousa's home there and his gravesite in Congressional Cemetery where I'm told he was buried in the uniform of a Navy Lieutenant Commander (USAF,Army, Marine = Captain, but a Navy Captain's rank is an Admiral).


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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2012

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