Just scales

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Invisible-Bob, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. soluna1

    soluna1 New Friend

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  2. Cornetista

    Cornetista New Friend

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    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  3. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    A musician that only plays scales and exercises, is like an football/baseball player that only does basic cardio and strength training...you might have some fitness, but if you can't play the game, what's the point?

    It's called a Musical Instrument for a reason.

    One's approach should be balanced between technique/fitness, repertoire, and Musicianship... and weak areas are what should be exercised the most, so all areas progress evenly.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    WAAAAYYY back when, I was a bodybuilder. The guys that never won anything where the guys that only worked on their biceps,chest, thighs. Those were the most impressive muscles. The guys that won were the guys that worked on their weak areas, calves, obliques, and forearms. They won because they were balanced all over. Nothing looked weirder than a guy with huge thighs but the calves of a 12 year old. If you want to be a complete player, you need to play the method books. My guess is you are trying to play the book too fast and get frustrated when you screw up. Life lesson 1: You will screw up! It is unavoidable which is the reason one practices to become more proficient. Life lesson 2: If the thought of screwing up keeps you from playing the book, you are in for a rough ride trumpetwise, so accept the idea that you will screw up and learn from it. PLAY the book and grow. Now go do the right thing.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Careful with your advice osboy, you don't want to pervert that poor lad into playing jazz now would ya!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yah, but the devil's in the details!
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yah, I can relate. I lift 180 pounds out of bed every morning when I get up... at least that is what the scales say. Not sure I like practicing that scale.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    One octave of chromatic scales ascending and descending will be how many notes? Such was a test question when I was in college and then I didn't have the correct answer either, but now I often attempt to play two octaves in that manner as a practice regimen.
     
  9. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    What do you want to do? You won't be able to take any leads that way, your rhythm will drag, and every song you play will sound the same, but your solos and harmony will probably sound alright, but similar since you don't practice intervals. The way I see it most songs are in a scale, so practicing a song is also practicing a scale, however practicing scales are not practicing songs.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    If you can't play a just a run of the chromatic scale ascending and descending centering each note in your practice regimen, I don't believe I'd want to hear you play a song. I'm not sayin' that a lot more techniques aren't needed to be learned in order play any song well. Two octaves up and down takes only about a minute and not only checks your ability, which for all varys some time to time, but also the condition of your instrument.
     

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