Just some general questions

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by niceguy, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. niceguy

    niceguy New Friend

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    Jan 6, 2015
    So i'm pretty sure this question has been asked before but i wasn't able to find it using the search. So I haven't played the trumpet in 10 years and i'm turning 24 and recently found my old trumpet and was wondering if i was to old to pick it back up? As for skill level wise i would love to get pretty decent at jazz. The trumpet is a blessings B-125 and it has a couple dings in it but looks like it's in good shape, should i upgrade it or stick with it in the mean time? Also when i do upgrade what would be a good jazz trumpet that you would recommend? And if you're wondering why i haven't played the trumpet in so long it is because when i started high school my attention moved to sports full time. Thank you very much for taking the time to read this and i really look forward to reading your answers!

    P.S. Do you guys have any recommendations on how to get better youtube, trumpet lessons, or books?
     
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  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    You're not too old, I started back at 40.

    Take the horn you have, clean it up, and find you a private teacher right away and take at least a couple lessons at first. Be aware it can take a long time to get back where you want to be, especially since you quit pretty young.

    But it's a lot of fun!

    Tom
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Age is never a factor if you have the passion to do something.

    See if you are able to follow through with your passion before you make an investment in what may wind up being futility.

    For jazz there is only one trumpet... a vintage Martin Committee.

    Invest in Bruce Haag by Skype. http://brucehaag.com/ He will put the passion back for you and he will be worth every penny. (He was Elvis's trumpet player during the Vegas years)
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    By the way, welcome to TM. Trust in Tom... He is the real deal here at TM.
     
  5. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    Dec 30, 2014
    It's never too late if you really want it. I just started again after 21 years away.
    It would be wise to get a private instructor, but ahead of that I would at the least get my hands on a copy of the Arban...an instructor would likely be teaching out of that to an extent anyway, plus it is the trumpet players' lifetime instruction manual.
    I wouldn't worry about a specific horn for quite some time yet, especially not one geared for jazz. I would recommend getting going on what you have (assuming it will work) and then going with something a little more advanced that will work for anything, and if after that you have the focus on jazz and the means to pursue it seriously, then you can get a horn that plays to jazz.
    Most of all, have fun! It's great to play.
     
  6. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Aug 2, 2010
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    Have fun! That's what it is all about.
    I played trumpet and (French) horn through college in several orchestras...then put them away until I was fifty. I was surprised how quickly the horn came back to me! I think it is easier to RELEARN something that you once were immersed in than to LEARN it for the first time. I never did get all the way back to where I was in college, but within a few months I was well capable of doing solo performances in front of hundreds, and absolutely loved it. The freedom to emote and poetically express though an instrument is so freeing. Enjoy it. Immerse in it.
     
  7. Furcifer

    Furcifer Pianissimo User

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    So you put it in the case at age 14? I'm assuming you played in school for about 5 years or so? At this point, you can pretty much do whatever you want. It won't take much to get back to where you were, but to advance quickly beyond that, a private teacher and steady practice is key. Remember it's better to play for 15 or 20 minutes, two or three times a day than it is to try to tear off an hour at one sitting. Even when you CAN practice "effectively" for two hours at a time, it's still better to break that up to no more than half an hour at a time.

    I'm coming back after a 20-year career doing something else that would keep me from playing for months at a time, so my progress would always get set back, and that's very frustrating. I've got a bit left to do, but as soon as I get settled on my next job, I'll be looking around for private lessons. It's better to do that in-person, but WOW, so much has changed in 20 years! Skype and youtube and these forums offer a wealth of resources that I never had "growing up"...

    ...speaking of which, some of us never really "grew up", but we at least grew "larger", and so the mouthpiece you are using may or may not be constrictive for you. You won't be able to tell that, really, for at least a few weeks. In fact, even though I grew up being told that the ultimate goal was to be able to play everything on a 1C, these days there is a new movement in favor of smaller rim sizes, at least. Cup styles and shapes, as well as throat and backbore can be changed at will without a detrimental effect on a player-in-shape. My teacher is telling me now that I shouldn't even think about switching from what I played before until I get back in shape. I stopped playing with a band on a daily basis when I was your age now (24), and then tapered off over the next 4 years or so. Having now lived 2 of those lifetimes, LOL, I'm determined to make the trumpet a much bigger part of the next 24 years.

    Getting back into the shape I was in at 24 and playing 6 hours a day is not realistic, because I'm not going to play 6 hours a day, HOWEVER, getting back into the same shape that a lot of the guys in my sections were in at the time, is realistic, and I can at least do that kind of playing until hopefully more opportunities to play come along. The key to that is taking regular lessons so as to motivate regular practice, at the very least, and then getting a regular gig (community band or whatever), because that's what really gets me in shape to do the kind of playing I really like to be able to do. If you can find a way to have fun with what you've got, where you are, then the sky's the limit, because you WILL get better - and the better you are, the more fun it is.
     
  8. niceguy

    niceguy New Friend

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    Jan 6, 2015
    Thank you everyone for answering my questions! I'm definitely going to look around for a private tutor and also pick a copy of that book up "arban" i can't wait to see where this takes me and i am proud to be part of such an awesome community!
     
  9. Furcifer

    Furcifer Pianissimo User

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    Arban, Clarke's Technical Studies, Schlossberg's Daily Drills and a Real Book to keep it real!
     
  10. cfkid

    cfkid Pianissimo User

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    Jul 24, 2013
    I'll second this. Bruce sticks to the Claude Gordon method of learning to play, but he and Gordon's approach have done wonders for me. I still have a long way to go, but I'm learning more than I ever thought I could.

    Mark
     

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