keeping time

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

    3,452
    2,709
    May 14, 2011
    Hawaian homey
    Nice way with words, LOL. "All's well that ends well", I suppose. I still think that the best way to work these things out is in rehearsals or during a sit-down session behind closed doors, not by usurping the conductor's authority while a concert is actually underway. But these are dynamics between performers and conductors that are situational. You were there, I wasn't.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Steve, I liked your concept about walking the music ... as due to health issue I must walk as much as possible. I just fanny pack along my CD player and a few CDs and am good to go. I suppose no one composed more or better marchs than Sousa, but some of his are now a huffer and puffer for me to now keep in step with although earlier in life they would have been no problem.
     
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

    3,452
    2,709
    May 14, 2011
    Hawaian homey
    Get yourself some good ole Prussian marches then for those days when Sousa is getting the upper leg on you.

    Radetzkymarsch Radetzkymarsch - YouTube
    Prüssens Gloria Preussens Gloria - YouTube
    Königgrätzer Marsch Königgrätzer Marsch - YouTube

    These are more my speed. ;-)
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    I've worked hard on not tapping my foot during performances and it seems to help me feel the rythym.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2011
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    A few of these have been in my repertoire, especially Radetzky as has been a New Year's request, but dare I put Sousa and any of these on the same program ... never happen, at least not in the Town of Jackson NC and I'll not go into the reason why. Sousa, during WWI, thought Americans should cease and desist all Prussian music including their wedding march and so he composed one. Well, all I can say is anyone who wants to get married to Sousa's wedding march should seek psychiatric care (my personal opinion) as I wouldn't have hung on for 9.5 minutes, as even now I can walk East- West through the Town of Jackson in that time, even though it is a musical showpiece. My overveiw of Prussian marchs is that many favor the lower brass moreso than other ethnic origins and some have a very strong yet slow tempo as from a bombard drum, yet others have the faster gait that gives me urge to step onto a dance floor ... near to a polka that I wouldn't dare try now ... alas, such is only a memory now, along with regular 5 and frequent 10K runs.
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon

    During a few recordings, we can hear my foot tapping .....:roll: ...... Yes, it has a nice rhythm, but it's not supposed to be there!!! I need a foot mute.

    Clapping out rhythms by hand (without the trumpet) can really help set these into your system. There's a whole series of rhythms specifically for this in one of my band method books.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2011
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    When practicing, wear big fluffy bedroom slippers and set your feet on a pad of 4 inch thick neoprene. Well, at least your feet will be warm.
     
  8. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

    384
    46
    Feb 6, 2010
    Randolph, New Jersey
    This is a difficult topic.

    I usually teach students to beat their foot very mechanically to "externalize" or demonstrate to me that they are "internalizing" the time. After all, the body can't do what the brain isn't "telling" it to do. Learning how to count and playing in time are only sort of related as well. Then we go into "tap while learning and move only your toe inside your shoe while performing". After all, rhythm is movement.

    Learning how to count and read requires visual identification of the notes and symbols on the page and instantly associating with them their mathematical values that means, they must be memorized. If you externalize, your teacher can then determine what is happening inside your head and help you understand what you're doing right and what you're doing wrong. Teaching isn't telling: learning is a process through guided repetition.

    Playing in time is related but somewhat different as it requires the development of sensitivity to the pulse and subdivisions within the pulse. Students often rush the easy parts and slow down the more technically demanding parts as their "friendly foot" bends the time around their lack of technique. That's where judicious use of the metronome can be helpful in identifying those places and informing the student where technical work needs to be done and where he/she has got to "put on the brakes".

    Carmine Caruso's book on musical calisthenics for brass REQUIRES foot tapping for the player to control the physical aspects playing the trumpet. He believed that for the muscles to perform they must be synchronized. To be synchronized they must have perfect timing. He felt that this externalization allowed the mind to control all aspects of playing with precision. To play in time (or in tune, for that matter) with others requires that you yourself can play in time (or in tune) - is not the conductor's job.

    I liked the expression from an earlier post but, would like to change it to "concurrence of action". In math class, if we're all working on the same problem, some can calculate the answer in their head and others need to write some or all of it out, but eventually, we all get the right answer. In music, those calculations must be done in unison.

    Think of the metronome as you would a tuner; metronomes calibrate time - tuners calibrate pitch. Having a tuner won't make you play in tune but, it could help. The same with metronomes.

    Record yourself while using the metronome and hear for yourself what's going on.

    Signed,
    A 31 veteran music teacher.
     
  9. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

    2,005
    1,311
    Jul 18, 2011
    UK
    I read somewhere that if you must tap a foot, tap the left one, as it requires the right side of the brain to do so, and that is the 'musical' side of the brain.
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Yes, that is something I offered to TMers some time ago - I have forgotten the source.
     

Share This Page