Lacquer Removal.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hubnub, Nov 7, 2007.

  1. hubnub

    hubnub Piano User

    322
    2
    May 4, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    Hey All,

    I've been tossing around the idea of removing the lacquer (not epoxy lacquer) from my horn myself (mainly b/c I don't have a back up and can't afford the time restrains to ship it off). I've bought this lacquer remover from Lowe's but someone mentioned to Bath tub/boiling water method. Anyone ever try this? Successful? Pain in the butt?:dontknow:

    Just want to hear some feed back on the whole issue. A local older trumpet player suggested the same method.

    I've read some past threads on this whole topic, but just wanted to see about the boiling water method.

    Thanks folks.:thumbsup:
     
  2. brunets

    brunets Pianissimo User

    117
    0
    May 28, 2007
    Gatineau,QC
    Yes, hot or boiling water should do (at least, partly) the job on a old non-epoxy lacquer.

    And add vinegar to your mix and you'll get a "chemical cleaning" too :D
    (disclaimer : I did this and it was efficient but I am not sure it is really good for the horn)

    St├ęphane
     
  3. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

    831
    5
    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    I removed lacquer from my trumpet using "Lacquer Remover" from Home Depot.

    This is basically acetone, if I'm correct. it will remove the layer, but leaves a residue the same color as the horn.

    I then used Brasso to polish and remove the residue.

    It's 98% done... only the hard to reach parts are partially done.

    Good luck.

    Used this in a well vented place.
    :cool:
     
  4. hubnub

    hubnub Piano User

    322
    2
    May 4, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    Thanks all. The stuff I bought is probablly pretty similar to the Home Depot stuff. How about the Patena color? Any tips on how to speed that process up? I've heard lots of finger prints. And to keep your hands from turning green, I've also heard that you wipe it down very often with a cloth. Anybody use anything in particular?
     
  5. MrWho3421

    MrWho3421 Pianissimo User

    142
    2
    Jun 1, 2006
    Get a valve guard.
     
  6. hubnub

    hubnub Piano User

    322
    2
    May 4, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    uumm.... thanks....
     
  7. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

    831
    5
    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    I just wash my hands often. I like the dirty and gritty look though :)
     
  8. study888

    study888 Mezzo Forte User

    Age:
    67
    929
    54
    Aug 22, 2005
    Darlington S.C.
    Hello Hubnub. I took the laquer off my 1942 36A Conn Concert Grand Cornet with two non toxic cleaners. They also give your horn a good chem clean to boot. I used 8 oz. of Orange TKO Cleaner and 8 oz. of Simple Green Cleaner from Wal-Mart. The Web. site for the TKO is Orange TKO or Orange TKO . I did it in my bath tub. I have overhead fan ventilation in that bathroom as well. The stuff will not kill you. But has a very powerful orange smell. Run enough hot water to cover cornet. Add said amounts. Let soak 20 minutes or so. Could wipe off most with hand cloth. The rest with a toothbrush in tight places. After laquer removed. Drain water. Rerun and reclean just with the simple green cleaner. Rinse with clean water and dry. As for as a lasting metal polish for Brass. The concentrated Flitz metal polish is hard to beat. I have tried the MAAS metal polish. Flitz is much better.web site is www.flitz.com . You can use the TKO at a stronger mix if you like. If your laquer is a newer type and harder to remove. Hope this helps. As I like the raw brass look and feel. Not turning my hands green. And is turning a pretty patina brass color. I have a 1948 King Master Cornet. I plan to stripp next month . It will be a beauty with all that old laquer gone.Good luck.
     
  9. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    I stripped my '47 Conn 22b. I first tried Acetone and basically got nowhere with that. Then I bought a new can of Brasso, a bag of rags and in less than two hours had the old lacquer off. For some reason I don't have the problem with green or black hands, although I do hold the trumpet with a cloth in my left hand. I polish the horn about once a week with Brasso, which takes about fifteen minutes tops. The horn looks great without the old, badly worn lacquer and sounds great too. Good luck on your venture!
     
  10. hubnub

    hubnub Piano User

    322
    2
    May 4, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    Thanks for all the help folks...... I played a gig tonight with a cat who had a raw Cannonball. That basically helped me make up my mind. So.....Tomorrow is the night. I'll let ya'll know how it turns out.
     

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