Lacquer Removal.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hubnub, Nov 7, 2007.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Not to be forgotten is the ugliness factor--if a trumpet is truly ugly, the audience will assume that a.) it must be an excellent instrument (otherwise no one in their right mind would play an ugly bad trumpet) and b.) the player must be excellent as well (or at least excellent enough not to care if the instrument is ugly or not). Unlacquered brass with a bit of a patina is more than being about sound or fashion--it makes a statement!
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  2. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

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    Can anyone give me a link to a de-laquered trumpet? Also, what in the world are heavy caps used for?
     
  3. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

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    Sorry, I meant a link to a picture of a de-laquered trumpet.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    If polished, the unlacquered trumpet looks just like a lacquered one. If unpolished, well check out some pennys--unlacquered trumpets will "age" the same way until they are polished again.

    Heavy bottom caps, by adding mass to the valve block, can make the horn feel more stable while playing, with better slotting. This may or may not be something we desire.
     
  5. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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    Thanks Brem, I'll get some tomorrow. Like the way the horn sounds now and that mottled dark finish is kind of.............unique for me, sets off the nickled parts.
     
  6. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    I just got back from the music repair shop (where the guy did a botched job, but that's another story), so I'll take a picture of my unlackered horn WITH a heavy bottom valve cap (two birds with one stone!).
     
  7. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    This is my trumpet with the lacquer removed. You can compare with the pictures under my signature. It's the same horn, before the process.

    The second picture is that of the pistons, and of the heavy bottom cap on the third one. Please excuse the dirt, I didn't shine it yet, just got it back from the repair shop.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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    Well, I got impatient and didn't feel like going to the store, so I looked thru the kitchen cupboard and found some Copper Glo powder cleans which says its good for brass too! My wife says, why not do the bottoms of the Revere Ware while you're at it, so I did. Anyway, after working with Copper Glo, rough side of a sponge and a brillo type pad, I got most of the residue dark mottled stuff and some more nasty stuff and it looks pretty decent. WILL get Brasso though and work on it some more. Not a valuable horn and the valves are problematical, so a good one to gain experience on. Has a great bright tone, though.:D
     
  9. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

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    Thanks for the pictures, brem. Can you send a trumpet to a repair shop and get it de-lacquered?
     
  10. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    Yes, you can.
     

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