Large Bore Trumpets - Not Suitable for Newbies or Average Joes?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by zorrosg, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. ExtraTeeth

    ExtraTeeth Pianissimo User

    223
    57
    Nov 13, 2008
    Perth, Western Australia
    I'm in a similar situation. I live around 4000 km from the nearest decent stock of trumpets so trying is not feasible.
    I've bought a few horns online and, like you, my experience has been good.
    The Jupiter you are looking at is a fine professional model instrument. It will certainly feel more 'open' than your current trumpet but not just because of bore size.
    If the deal on offer is a spectacularly good one I'd say go for it. If it doesn't work out for you, you should be able to sell it on if there is such a dearth of quality instruments in your home town. Otherwise maybe wait a while.
     
  2. zorrosg

    zorrosg Pianissimo User

    63
    2
    Jan 30, 2011
    Hey g'day mate! I've a good pal of mine now in Perth studying at WAAPA..

    Could you elaborate on the 'more open' point above? What I am concerned is running out of air, so if the difference is say 10-15% in terms of stamina, then I'd be quite comfortable giving it a go, but if the demands are radically higher, than I'd better look for a smaller bore instrument.

    Reselling a trumpet here would be rather difficult. If it was a guitar, then chances would be much better. Anyway, I'm a bit of a collector type, so I never mind an extra instrument or two.

    Finally, when you say this Jupiter 1604S is good, are you speaking from owning or playing it, or just from reading about other people's experiences with this horn? Tks
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,404
    7,515
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    At .462, that is just at the small side of large bore. I do not think it would be a major issue. As has been said, it is only one facet of the horns construction. If it were a .468, I might think twice. I own a Blessing with a .468 that is 50 yrs old and is showroom new. It's that way because it was bought for a beginner in the 7th grade who couldn't handle the size and requirements of the horn. His parents wanted him to have the best and not just a "student" horn. Their mistake is my gain. Concerning "the guide", use it to start a fire or something similar. 90% of horns today are .459/.460 !:thumbsup:
     

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