Largest Flugel Mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by David Hall, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. David Hall

    David Hall Pianissimo User

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    I am looking for a new mouthpiece for flugel playing and wondered what the largest diameter one on the market was?

    Ideally I would like one of over 18mm in diameter and wondered if such a beast existed? Usual caveat around flugel tapers is noted.

    Any advice would be gratefully recieved.

    Thanks in anticipation!
    DJH
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Around 17mm is the largest production flugel mouthpieces that there are (Bach/Denis Wick/Monette/GR). Schilke has a size 20 flugel mouthpiece making it around 17.78.

    Why do you think that you need one (without ever having played one)? I could only imagine it working on a non standard flugel like a Getzen 4 valve.
     
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  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    My Flip Oakes WT 3C has a 17.5 mm diameter. It works GREAT on my non standard Kanstul 1526.

    This mouthpiece gives you the room to move that allows so much flexibility to float the air into that deep V cup. Once floated, that textured sound is unstoppable!
     
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  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Sorry, I don’t buy that. That is not how “mouthpieces” work. Players with great strength and playing opportunities have the chops to make even “nonsensical” things work. Extra large mouthpieces actually reduce control at trumpet pitches. Especially with a flugelhorn, the goal is intimacy. I have experimented in depth with various flugelhorn and mouthpiece combinations. Floating air is something that is possible even with more standard sizes. Textured sound comes from the brain not the hardware.

    Mine is bigger than yours is not a befitting answer.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I am not disagreeing. I said "floating" not control. I too have compared between this and shallower mouthpieces and I am able to "float better" with the Flip Oakes. So while floating is possible with standard sizes (again I don't disagree) I can float more with a deeper piece. So while mine may not be bigger than yours, it ain't the size... its the motion.

    The more depth to "play" with the air, the more "texturing" is possible with varying pressure effects on that air and THAT does take more control (for which the width of the piece helps) and gives you an oh so intimate sound.

    Check out the intimacy that is possible with the deeper mouthpiece with this cut, Daisy from our never to be released quintet recording:
    https://soundcloud.com/user-296675506/daisy

    Also agree the brain has most to do with it, but having the equipment that works more in tandem with the brain is a nice paring.
     
  6. David Hall

    David Hall Pianissimo User

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    Thanks that's useful. So 17mm would be the maximum viable size to allow the necessary responsiveness? I suppose my question is framed by wanting to move as seamlessly as possible between my main instrument (alto horn) and flugel. I use a 19mm mouthpiece for my horn and thought the largest flugel mouthpiece would aid going backwards forwards. Sounds like it may be a silly idea though!

    Cheers, I didn't know of it's existence so I'll have a look at that mouthpiece.
     
  7. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    Back when I was a trombone player dabbling in high brass, I played a full set of Schilke 24 mouthpieces -- trumpet, cornet, and flugelhorn. I used the 24 flugel mouthpiece with a Bach 183 flugelhorn. Of the three mouthpieces, the flugel piece was the one I played the longest -- even after I had downsized to Bach 1's on trumpet and cornet.

    But don't consider this a recommendation. IMPO, you're better off developing a working embouchure on a standard size rim and then upsizing as needed as your small-mouthpiece embouchure strengthens.
     
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  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that there is good reason why the spread of mouthpiece sizes is what it is.
    I also think that the use case for the fringe sizes is limited, comprimised.

    There is often confusion between “dark” and “size”. My personal take is that even a Bach 1¼ or Schilke 18 is “specialty”. Players without especially strong playing habits simply sound “dull” with these mouthpieces. There is a handful of players however that do get fine results. All of the ones that I know are professional players with heavy playing schedules.

    Bragging about size is contraproductive, especially when it comes to getting a general view of what is going on.
     
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  9. David Hall

    David Hall Pianissimo User

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    Thanks both - I think the best step is to keep on trying to develop a good emboucher using a standard mouthpiece. I have a Wick 2FL at the moment which I like, particularly the lovely sound in the lower register. Practice, practice, practice is the key I suppose... no shortcuts or quick fixes!
     
  10. Trevor4261

    Trevor4261 New Friend

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    I own a curry 3FLD and while it has a really nice, mellow tone, it is just too big to use realistically. The intonation is all over the place. Not to mention the chops needed to actually play on it for an extended period of time. The cup is a deep v shape, similar to a french horn mouthpiece.
     

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