Largest Flugel Mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by David Hall, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Trying out the new toy?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I already have tested quite a bit. The mouthpieces are "too good" and far better than expected. The playing qualities are excellent and I am even getting the pitch center dialed in. I am learning to create 3D files. Mouthpieces are easy with a 2D drawing spun 360° on axis. I think that the printer has advanced to "tool" from "toy".

    A great addition is the ability to print LaTromba T2 valve oil bottle caps. The originals crack and leak after a short period of time.
     
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  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Not only the caps - the bottles, too! That's why I'm using Bach oil for tight valves and Zaja Blue for the leakier stuff...
     
  4. scottfsmith

    scottfsmith Piano User

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    I have also made mouthpieces on my 3D printer, over 100 designs by now. Its very cool to be able to just tweak a few parameters in a spreadsheet and voila out comes a new mouthpiece! I do the same design method, make a 2D plot in Excel then import to a CAD tool (Rhino in my case) and give it a 360° spin. Its possible to do more but I'm no CAD expert. The only reason why I stopped (for now) is the material is not the best for sound or durability. I print with a 50-50 metal-PLA material which is better than pure PLA but I prefer 100% metal.
     
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  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    3D printing is for efficient prototyping. Once you have a winning design, the same 3D file can be sliced for a milling machine.

    I am actually quite pleased with the PLA and PetG sound as well as the feel of the rim.
     
  6. scottfsmith

    scottfsmith Piano User

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    Right, it's awesome for prototyping and its not like the lighter material ruins the sound or anything, it's just a bit different. Many of my designs have an overhanging rim and the standard CNC machines can't mill those, I tried several different services. A metal scintering printer can do it but those prints are $1K a pop, ouch! So the winners I have been putting into metal by hand on a lathe. For most designs a CNC machine should be able to put them into metal for not too much $$. But you also have to worry about shrinkage of the 3D printer spec vs the output, its surprisingly large and is not consistent over the length of the mouthpiece.
     
  7. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    Maybe that's a better solution for my bottles of Hetman than putting them all in plastic bags. :bash:
     
  8. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    Sometimes you stumble onto an item you had never intended to make, and it becomes a favorite. Right?
     
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  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    My favorite item is ALWAYS the next one regardless if we are talking about trumpets, mouthpieces or diverse 3D printed objects.
     
  10. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    That’s exactly how I treat my paintings. The next one is going to be the very best one I have ever done.
     
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