Last Post - How to acheive bugle sound?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JonJo, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    There have been other threads on this subject - you might like to search on Taps, Buglers Across America BAA (I think, sorry), toothpaste (yes, we had a bit of a discussion if were wise to clean your teeth with paste before a gig), Bugles, Field Trumpets - see how you go, it might be fun. I would get in a bit of practice, too.
     
  2. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

    764
    74
    Jan 17, 2007
    Australia
    You will need to play both no matter what service. You play the Last Post, there is a minutes silence,they recite the ode and then face East and you play revielle. When they ask you to play the Last Post, they mean both.
     
  3. Brian H. Smout

    Brian H. Smout Piano User

    Hi,

    I've played Last Post countless times. Trumpet sub for bugle is more common than not. Yes, you will play Last Post and after a one minute silence you will then play "Reveille", technically speaking found in bugle call books listed as 'The Rouse'.

    If there is a bagpiper present, check to see when they will play during the service. No need to step on their bags, as it were, with a mistimed entry.

    Cheers,

    Brian

    ex Lake Superior Scottish Regt. of Canada
     
  4. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

    764
    74
    Jan 17, 2007
    Australia
    I find that it helps immensely, but come double tonguing and im effectively stuffed :-([/quote]
    In the double tonguing part,try saying 'doo doo goo doo'
     
  5. robotbender

    robotbender New Friend

    7
    0
    Mar 20, 2009
    With ANZAC day being next weekend, my suggestions are pretty much the same as the previous posters.

    But, make sure to play the dynamics, even if outside! This is especially important on the Rouse, it's the icing on the cake (forteish for the first phrase, mf-ish for the second phrase, and ff for the last bit).

    I find that I when I play it, or any of the other buglers in the military band play it, we tend towards a sharp sound about halfway in between mellow and bright.

    And yes, it is called the Rouse, not Reveille. Reveille is a very different call. It is not even close to the American version (Canadian here)
     
  6. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

    764
    74
    Jan 17, 2007
    Australia
    The original poster is from Australia. We call it Reveille. It is referred to as this in every ANZAC ceremony.
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,797
    2,356
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Folks,

    I have accessed the Australian War Memorial website for this question and their interpretation on the Last Post, the One Minute Silence, and finally the Rouse and Reveille is interpreted in the Australian context. I know it is a bit wordy but .......

    QUOTE
    In military tradition, the Last Post is the bugle call that signifies the end of the day's activities. It is also sounded at military funerals and commemorative services such as ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day to indicate that the soldier has gone to his final rest.

    The Last Post is one of a number of bugle calls in military tradition that mark the phases of the day. While Reveille signaled the start of a soldier's day, the Last Post signaled its end. The call is believed originally to have been part of a more elaborate routine, known in the British Army as "tattoo", that had its origins in the 17th century. In the evening, a duty officer had to do the rounds of his unit's position, checking that the sentry posts were manned and rounding up the off-duty soldiers and packing them off to their beds or billets. He would be accompanied by one or more musicians. The first post was sounded when the duty officer started his rounds and, as the party proceeded from post to post, a drum was played. The drum beats told off-duty soldiers it was time to rest; if the soldiers were billeted in a town, the beats told them it was time to quit the pubs. "Tattoo" is a derivation of doe den tap toe, Dutch for "turn off the taps", a call which is said to have followed the drum beats in Dutch pubs while British armies were campaigning through Holland and Flanders in the 1690s. (The American practice of "taps" or "drum taps" also originated from the routine.) Another bugle call was sounded when the party completed its rounds, reaching the "last post" – this signaled the night sentries were alert at their posts and gave one last warning to any soldiers still at large to retire for the evening.

    The Last Post was eventually incorporated into funeral and memorial services as a final farewell, and symbolises the duty of the dead is over and they can rest in peace.

    Silence for one or two minutes is included in the ANZAC Day ceremony as a sign of respect and a time for reflection. The idea for the two-minutes silence is said to have originated with Edward George Honey, a Melbourne journalist and First World War veteran who was living in London in 1919. He wrote a letter to the London Evening News in which he appealed for five-minutes silence, to honour the sacrifice of those who had died during the war. In October 1919 Sir Percy Fitzpatrick, a South African, suggested a period of silence on Armistice Day in all the countries of the empire. Fitzpatrick's idea had its origins in a period of silence that was observed at noon in Cape Town following heavy losses among the South African Brigade on the Western Front; this observance continued until the end of the war. Fitzpatrick's idea was presented to King George V, who readily agreed to the proposal. But after a trial with the Grenadier guards at Buckingham Palace, at which both Honey and Fitzpatrick were present, the period of silence was shortened to two minutes. The connection between Honey and Fitzpatrick, and their ideas, if any existed at all, is unclear. On 6 November 1919 the King sent a special message to the people of the Commonwealth:
    I believe that my people in every part of the Empire fervently wish to perpetuate the memory of that Great Deliverance, and of those who laid down their lives to achieve it.
    The King continued to ask that "a complete suspension of all our normal activities" be observed for two minutes at "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" so that "in perfect stillness the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the Glorious Dead". Two-minutes silence was first observed in Australia on the first anniversary of the armistice and continues to be observed on Remembrance Day. The two-minutes silence has over the years been incorporated into ANZAC Day and other commemorative ceremonies. (This is now generally accepted and practiced as one minute of silence.)

    However, after the one minute silence, flags are raised from half mast to the masthead as the Rouse is sounded. Today it is associated with the Last Post at all military funerals, and at services of dedication and remembrance.

    Since Roman times, bugles or horns had been used as signals to command soldiers on the battlefield and to regulate soldiers' days in barracks. The Reveille was a bright, cheerful call to rouse soldiers from their slumber, ready for duty; the call has also been adopted to conclude funeral services and remembrance services. It symbolises an awakening in a better world for the dead and "rouses" the living, their respects paid to the memory of their comrades, back to duty. The Rouse is a shorter bugle call, which, as its name suggests, was also used to call soldiers to their duties. Due to its much shorter length, the Rouse is most commonly used in conjunction with the Last Post at remembrance services. The exception is the Dawn Service, when the Reveille is played.
    UNQUOTE

    For your interest you might like to try www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2009
  8. Rushtucky

    Rushtucky Pianissimo User

    242
    2
    Sep 15, 2008
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Trumpet and/or bugle are basically the same. If you want a more deeper tone on the trumpet use the 1st and 3rd valves.

    There is a group of us that play TAPS when called upon for military funerals. Our organization is called Bugles Across America. Bugles Across America : Home This is a great organization and in need of buglers to play with an Honor Guard instead of the standard tape recording. This gives those that have served our country true military honors.
     
  9. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

    7,070
    4,661
    Jan 30, 2009
    Melbourne Australia
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

    7,070
    4,661
    Jan 30, 2009
    Melbourne Australia
    Jonjo,
    Use Trumpet/cornet or Flugelhorn, and play with passion. The bugle has a distinctive sound, but it will not noticed. I have heard trombone players play it,and get away with it.

    Do not forget that you need to play Rouse as well after the 2 minutes silence.
    If you have a DAWN Service, then Reville is expected...again not the American, but the British/ANZAC - this is difficult.
    DO NOT use any mute. In the end it is a case of practice, and the respect for those that have fallen....your best will be good enough on the day.

    BTW - you can use a LYRE on a Trumpet/cornet to carry the music.

    Cheers
     

Share This Page