Latin resonance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by kctrump, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. kctrump

    kctrump New Friend

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    Nov 6, 2005
    Greetings,

    I have a rather odd question. I've read much on the internet addressing resonance. I've seen the Yamaha web page with Media clips defining the term. What comes to mind is the great "legit" players in the orchestra setting playing with great resonance.

    Is there such a thing as playing with resonance when playing in a latin style band? The edge needed to play lead in a latin band would be the opposite of what many consider resonant.

    back to lurking...
     
  2. wilcox96

    wilcox96 Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 31, 2005
    charlotte nc
    The edge needed to play lead in a latin band would be the opposite of what many consider resonant.


    I completely disagree with this. While the timbre may be different...style of tonguing...etc, the resonance is still key to a successful sound. (not to mention that positive, in tune resonance would help endurance on such a gig).

    Perhaps you just meant the desired sound for a latin band would differ from an orchestral one. Can't your sound be edgy AND resonant? I think so...
     
  3. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Bryon Stripling comes to mind here. He has the biggest, brightest sound I've heard live. wow!
     
  4. averagejoe

    averagejoe Pianissimo User

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    Oct 13, 2004
    Atlanta, GA
    kctrump --

    In my mind, resonance is the thing that allows all great players to do their job and sound good in the process. We may think about sound differently in different situations, but we all want to sound good (beautiful). Resonance is what makes that happen -- it is a sound that is rich in overtones. The player colors that sound to the situation they are in, using their ears (and appropriate equipment).

    Paul
     
  5. talcito

    talcito Piano User

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    Feb 18, 2004
    Resonance is a result of playing in tune and playing relaxed.......this cuts across any music genre.

    A couple of years ago I was playing with one the best lead players in the latin field(lead for fania allstars). He had me observe the young lead player in the big band we were playing. He says to me "look how tight he gets when he has to play in the upper register". The minute the guy got physically tight his sound and resonance diminished.

    Then he says "look at me playing lead....I am 74 years old".....this guy always plays relaxed and his lead sound just leads the band and provides the tonal color for the section......that's resonance.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Resonant just means letting the horn do as much work as possible. Playing on the resonant center of each note means not lipping up or down. It is the most efficient production of sound - the least effort for the maximum output.
    There is nothing in latin music that would inhibit resonance, except maybe a tequila or 2 too many............
     
  7. bas

    bas Pianissimo User

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    Jun 2, 2005
    Iowa City, IA/Corfu, GR
    Tal....are you talking about Victor Paz??
     
  8. bas

    bas Pianissimo User

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    Jun 2, 2005
    Iowa City, IA/Corfu, GR
    If so...he is one of the best!!
     
  9. kctrump

    kctrump New Friend

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    Nov 6, 2005
    Thanks for the response.

    I do believe your advice crossed into the "how to play correctly" area.

    Kctrump
     
  10. talcito

    talcito Piano User

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    Feb 18, 2004
    I was not referring to Victor Paz.....I was referring to another great player from that era named Hector 'Bomberito" Zarzuela. Both these guys did a large amount of the "latin" work back in the 60's,70's , and 80's.

    I never had the chance to play with Paz but have played with many of his students. They all tend to share common characteristics......a compact sound, very efficient players, great time.

    Paz was a difficult teacher.....one of my friends once asked to take lessons with him. He told him "No problem, be at my place at 530AM"! Upon arriving at the lesson, he noticed there was so much spit under Paz's trumpet that he must have already been practicing for an hour himself. Shortly after that, he took him to the window and showed him the taxis passing by and says "Son, the way you play now, you will never make as much money as those guys driving the yellow cars.....If you don't dedicate yourself I suggest you drive a cab instead".

    If you want to hear a beautifully resonant sound check out the movie "Mambo Kings" where he does all the solo work for actor Antonio Banderas......he also plays lead on many of the big band tunes in that movie.
    Playing latin lead, is really what the guys in NYC remember him most for(oh yes, and the show Cats).
     

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