Lead Pipe Buzzing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trjeam, Jan 19, 2006.

  1. trjeam

    trjeam Pianissimo User

    109
    2
    Dec 5, 2003
    Maryland
    I'm curious as to what you guys (specially the 3 wise men) thoughts are regarding lead pipe buzzing.

    I tried it for the first time today and I noticed that it's a great way to center and focus everything from chops to sound. The only problem was that when I went to play normally I would double buzz but I think that flow studies would help that out.

    I think that lead pipe buzzing would be a great tool to help me get that focused center feeling. Once I get the feeling all I would have to do is practice flow studies to help "smooth out the edges". The great thing is that I've noticed that with even just minimal lead pipe buzzing you can obtain that feeling.

    So my question how do you guys use it? or how should it be used?
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Ha! The first time I did leadpipe buzzing was when i was recently over at dave's shop and he was working on my tuning slide! So i entertained the guys in the shop by playing tunes on the lead pipe. Of course it was in the low register because the leadpipe won't support the upper harmonics in the same way. It was fun. I haven't done it since, though.

    ML
     
  3. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

    1,840
    2
    Oct 24, 2003
    3 Wise Men?

    Does that mean we have to also find a Virgin?

    :dontknow:
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Looks like the Three Wise Guys, to me...

    ML
     
  5. talcito

    talcito Piano User

    393
    8
    Feb 18, 2004
    You may want to check out the Chase Sanborn books. In his books he gives a leadpipe buzzing routine that is very effective and is very similar to a routine that TM contributor Trent Austin taught me.

    I found lead pipe buzzing to be very effective in helping develop a nice, round sound and also in helping you become very aware of the need to increase air speed in the upper register.

    If you over-do the ledpipe buzzing I have found the embochure will tend to open up a bit too much......I try to counterbalance the leadpipe buzzing with mouthpiece buzzing to help balance the situation.
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    I thought most people did this type of buzzing for response. Perhaps someone like PH could weight in and give us the ins and outs as to why people do this exercise.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    You know what I think? It just occurred to me that the trumpet, at it's best, makes a beautiful sound, right? Well, how about the mouthpiece or the lead pipe? Are those beautiful sounds? Not really. So, what I think happens is that when you buzz the mouthpiece or leadpipe, if you have an ear that appreciates a beautiful sound, it makes us want to create something that appeals to us aeshetically.

    When you go about the task of turning a sow's ear into a musical silk purse, it HAS to improve your concept of sound on something that has the potential for a beautiful resonant sound.

    So, there's your answer top your original question, Talcito. If it stimulates you to making a beautiful sound, go for it and enjoy it. In fact, for fun, why don't you go around the house and find stuff to buzz and make beautiful sounds on? It might be a kick.

    ML
     
  8. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

    2,342
    6
    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Yeah, I have heard buzzing the leadpipe can be helpful, but I have never had a clear idea as to "how". I know several teachers use it as a solid part of their routines, but again, I have only heard of this method in bits and pieces and never have had a firm grasp on it. Anyone who has studied it or has a firm idea of its concept or origins, I would love to hear about it.

    Looking around the house for things to "play"...... Let's see, if I take one of my cats and put the mouthpiece.....ummm.......probably not a good idea. ;-)
     
  9. talcito

    talcito Piano User

    393
    8
    Feb 18, 2004
    Hi Manny:

    Yes, I am actually all for doing difficult activities in order to make the trumpet relatively easier....Heck I even tried the exercise the Chicago Symphony trombonist advised....you know, the one were you grease your valves with trombone grease...the trumpet is so much easier and sounds so beautiful after trying that!

    I used to be an avid baseball player and I guess the idea of swing a bat with a heavy donut on before going to the regular weight bat is an idea that I have always tried to cross over to trumpet practise. If you practised your martial arts with heavy wrist weights on wouldn't your hand speed increase afterwards?

    I actually carry a lead pipe with me in my case----sometimes I will have to warm up without the horn before a gig and the feeling of playing the leadpipe helps get things going.

    manny, I actually took your advise you gave me once about buzzing on the mouthpiece musically(Tunes instead of tones) andI have found it very helpfull....You recomended buzzing "Maria" from Westside story ....If my "Maria" buzz starts off solid I know its going to be a great day!Thanks!
     
  10. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

    609
    1
    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Jorge,

    I use the mouthpiece / leadpipe combination everyday in my practice. There are lots of different ways to approach this, and I like to experiment to see what works best for me. Because of this, I’ve learned quite a bit about my playing.

    I’ll start with a quote from Bill Adam, since this really is the essence of what I want to accomplish with this drill:

    Bill Adam
    I know there has to be a certain amount of mouthpiece buzzing to warm up the resilience that we have to have here. But, if we can set the mouthpiece and tube in vibration, the embouchure is much more relaxed. What we're trying to do is to get the air through that horn with the least amount of tension and the least amount of muscle.

    With that in mind, all of the leadpipe playing that I do these days is on the 1st fundamental of the pipe (about a low Eb). I begin the sound without using the tongue and listen for immediacy in the response. I play at about a mp to mf dynamic. Blowing “harder†tends to mask the fine response that I’m trying to achieve with this exercise.

    The sound needs to be “forwardâ€. It needs to have a buzzy quality. You don’t get this by blowing “harderâ€. When I first starting doing these exercises, I found that while my response was immediate, my sound was somewhat foggy and farther back in my mouth. After quite a few weeks of just beginning the sound with a breath attack, I started using some articulations after I got the note started. I chose to use a “K†tongue (I like to think of a more forward “Que†sound).

    By doing this Que articulation, I discovered that my sound took on that forward buzzy quality that I had read about. I will do quite a few of these articulations. When I first started these, my tongue would get tired pretty quickly and then I would get some tension happening. If you feel tension, stop and rest. The idea is to approach these “with the least amount of tension and the least amount of muscle.â€

    So, one note (about Eb concert), gentle approach, focus on immediacy of response, achieve a forward buzzy quality. A complete sound is not necessarily a loud sound. Don’t get carried away with volume (and possible spreading). Let the pipe (horn) play the lips!

    Then carry this exact feeling to a second line G on the horn. I then move into the Caruso 6 Notes.

    The other approach to leadpipe buzzing can be found at the Brian Scriver web site. I’ve tried these and enjoyed them, but I’m back to staying on the Eb.

    Hope this helps!
     

Share This Page