Leadpipe numbering???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Is there any standard or rhymn and reason for leadpipe numbering?
    and
    MB2 ..Bob Malone leadpipe number ... means number 2 leadpipe?
     
  2. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Great question. I don't think so, but hopefully someone will know the answer. I know several of my horns have a 25. 25 what I am not sure.
     
  3. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    There is no standard, and generally neither rhyme nor reason. The Bach 25 leadpipe was the 25th design in a series that ran up to 44. The number tells us nothing about the specifications of the leadpipe. Same thing with the Calicchio leadpipes -- they were numbered sequentially, but there's no steady progression to the designs: the 9 leadpipe is open and dark; the 10 is tight and bright.

    I have a Pilczuk leadpipe that is labeled with two numbers that reveal the inner diameter at the small end and at the large end. Since you can deduce the rate of expansion from the external steps, there's not much mystery about that pipe. And I suspect that labeling system was dropped for just that reason, because I've never seen or heard of another Pilczuk pipe labeled that way.
     
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  4. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    I don't think there is any rhyme or reason to leadpipe size as is similar in no sytematic sizing in mouthpieces. One of the leading Acoustical-Physicist is Dr. Richard Smith of Smith Watkins Trumpet designs. He has done extensive studies in Trumpet acoustical-physics as applicable to trumpet designs. His scientific papers can be downloaded from his website. Following is a chart and descrition of his interchangeable lead pipes and their characteristics. Go to his graphic chart is available.

    Smith-Watkins B-flat Trumpet Leadpipes

    The Relative sizes and shapes of fifteen B-flat interchangeable leadpipes.

    #10 SERIES

    14/16 Larger Pipes, available for players who have chosen smaller instruments, have small mouthpieces, require a darker sound or have a lot of stamina!

    10/12 The most popular lead/jazz pipes.


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    #30 SERIES

    38 A large pipe, available for players who have chosen smaller instruments, have small mouthpieces, require a darker sound or have a lot of stamina!

    36 Slightly larger than the 34, this has become a popular pipe for principal players.

    34 One of the most popular symphonic/classical pipes.

    32 A smaller pipe, chosen by players who require a lighter sound with ease of playing.




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    #60 SERIES

    70 A large pipe, available for players who have chosen smaller instruments, have small mouthpieces require a darker sound or have a lot of stamina!

    66/68 These two pipes have similarities to the average Bach. Often used as an additional pipe with a 34/36. Good for small ensemble work. Also played by some studio musicians using the .460 bored instrument.

    64 A small pipe, used with a large belled instrument, will make a pronounced horn shape. Suitable for jazz.




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    Additional Notes

    Playing can become harder/stuffy with an instrument combination which is too large or too small.
    A large pipe often makes the sound darker; a smaller pipe can make the sound brighter.
    Other pipes are available, but are only recommended after consultation.
    Use these notes for guidance in conjunction with the published chart.

    Content (c) Smith-Watkins Designed and hosted by VTSDesign Web Services
     
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  5. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    Its just the number of your leadpipe, it works so use it. It gets pretty complicated if you really get into it, go to bachloyalist.com and spend some time reading.
     
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  6. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Thanks guys .. I didn't think it was standard but it seems all of a sudden I am reading things like "has a #7" leadpipe and I am ??????? okay now what does that mean... am I missing something.
     
  7. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    No coolerdave. I don't think your missing anything. Whenever I am studying to buy a trumpet I research the site extensively because each one has their own numbering system; however, they will explain it when I read long enough. Also in the case of my Smith Watkins I have emailed them. Dr. Smith personally answers all ails within 24 hrs. He is the leading expert. I have the #34 which is darker than a Bach 37 on my .464 nor trumpet. I also have the #10 which gives the brighter lead sound. Dr. Smith has been copied by Edwards Generation II, & Selmer Concept II. Although they font have as many options as him.
    My advice is to be diligent and read up on it for better understanding. It has to do with the metallurgy and the opening ventura and the conical expansion to the tuning slide.
    Playing a variety of horns gives you a distinct advantage. Of course recording and playing back helps get the feel for the tonal differences.
    I'm still learning as we all are.
    Best Regards.
     

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