Leadpipe replacement difficulty?

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Oldgreentoad, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. Oldgreentoad

    Oldgreentoad New Friend

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    Aug 30, 2005
    Portland, OR
    I just purchased an old Ambassador with a shot leadpipe and was wanting to know the degree of difficulty in replacing a leadpipe. Anyone with experience with this type of work your advice would be appreciated. Also, is there a horn repair manual that is widely used among professional technicians.
     
  2. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    I would imagine it is fairly easy if you can solder. The times that I have had it done, it was done at a shop because I don't trust myself with a torch and a trumpet.
     
  3. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    OldGreenToad,

    Its easy for a qualified brass tech to do. The disassembly is simple but assembly can be tricky - I would not attempt it myself.

    If you need a replacement leadpipe send me a PM, I have several.

    Greg
     
  4. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    I'd heard that replacing the leadpipe on an old Ambassador with one from a Bach (not sure which one) can give you quite an amazing horn.
     
  5. Oldgreentoad

    Oldgreentoad New Friend

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    Aug 30, 2005
    Portland, OR
    Toots,

    What do Bach leadpipes usually run cost wise and have you herd of any other models that work well with the Ambassador.

    Thanks,
    Jason
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    I'm sorry but I can't recall at the moment which leadpipe it is... it was about three or four years back that I read about the conversion. I know that a guy named "Albert Lilly" posted quite a bit about it... he recommended it as a method of turning an Ambassador into an excellent, pro-quality horn (improving on what is already pretty good).

    You might send him an email... I'm sure he'd respond. Here's his email:

    [email protected]

    For the cost, I wouldn't imagine it would take over about $150 or so but you'd need to talk to your local repairman to be certain.
     
  7. Oldgreentoad

    Oldgreentoad New Friend

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    Aug 30, 2005
    Portland, OR
    Toots,

    Thanks for information.

    Jason
     
  8. Sturmbill

    Sturmbill Pianissimo User

    237
    43
    Feb 11, 2004
    Virginia
    Guys,

    I think the Bach leadpipe they were talking about is the 43. It is supposed to turn the Ambassador into a decent-blowing, open horn. I will find out pretty soon because I am invloved in that project myself.

    I rpelaced a rotting leadpipe on my '47 Olds Special and was very pleased with the results. I used a 25-O on that one.

    Botht leadpipes were purchased from WWBW (I know...) for $73 a piece.

    I hope that helps a little!

    Regards,

    Bill
     
  9. Oldgreentoad

    Oldgreentoad New Friend

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    Aug 30, 2005
    Portland, OR
    Bill,

    Did you do the work yourself or have a tech do it? I would also very much like to hear your impressions of how the 43 leadpipe works out. Thanks

    Jason
     
  10. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    I've been a brass repair tech for over 30 years. Like someone said, if you have REALLY good solder skills, it is a simple job. If you don't, you will make a huge mess of it. You need a torch, some acid flux, and some solder with a fairly low melting temperature. I like to use flux that jewelers use. A butane torch can be obtained from almost any home improvement store. I got one about the size of a pencil that works great for small jobs.

    When you are resoldering the parts you have to heat both the brace and the mouthpipe to a temperature to melt the solder. Don't melt the solder with the torch, the resulting joint won't hold. The mating surfaces have to be scraped clean and sanded until they are nice and shiny. Don't overheat the metal or you will scorch the lacquer. You have to have a feel for melting the solder into the joint. Too much will make a mess. Not enough won't make a solid joint.
     

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