Leak between lead pipe and tuning slide

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bnk183, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. Bnk183

    Bnk183 New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2013
    Ugh! Maybe I'm just being overly finicky about this, but I'm not sure if this is common or not. I have a new cannonball 725 with only a couple of hours playing on it. I notice every 5-10 minutes of playing there is moisture (usually a single bead, see pic) right at the lead pipe tuning slide crease. Should this be happening with a brand new horn? kinda worried about it now. Any help would be appreciated.
     

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  2. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    Aug 9, 2004
    Santa Cruz County, CA
    It happens with new horns. The easiest fix is thicker tuning-slide grease. A repair tech can expand the inner slide leg and fix the problem at its source, but sometimes only the very end of the inner slide is expanded and the "fix" doesn't last very long. Try some anhydrous lanolin.
     
  3. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    I've noticed that my LTD-1 Bach does it as well. Might have to try re-greasing the slide:oops:
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    I'm surprised that this question has come up, but if you don't know....

    When it comes to things like tuning slides, tolerances are reasonably tight, but they aren't perfectly fitted, so might get a little bead of moisture there. If it's not affecting the blow or the sound, it's a non-issue. Grease it up again and call it a day. FWIW, I had a Strad would do that, and that was my main horn during most of my years as an Army bandsman. I never worried about it because the horn itself played fine.
     
  5. jaquine

    jaquine New Friend

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    Sep 8, 2013
    Sometimes this is just a tolerance issue, and can be fixed with some grease, but it can also be a defective tube on the tuning slide. For example, if the builder uses seamed tubing, there can be a failure on the seam. Eventually, the seam lets go, and you have to replace the tube (not an expensive repair-- cost me $40 when I had this problem on horn last year).
     

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