leblanc martin committee trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by yoelarry, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. yoelarry

    yoelarry New Friend

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    Just wondering what players think about the Leblanc Martin Committee trumpets particularly as a jazz horn? I don't see many out there. I realize the older Martins are hot items but the newer ones?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you don't see them, you are in the wrong circles or they are not that popular. I get around quite a bit internationally and have NEVER seen one on stage.

    That being said, in the right hands it could be the best horn on the planet. The problem is that "alternate" trumpet sounds seem to be frowned upon by the people that provide jobs. They seem to want Bach or really close clones. A disgusting trend when creativity is killed by uniformity.

    I often wonder what current production horns in 50 years will be the "desired ones". I think that the Monettes, Eclipse......... and the like will be scarfed up by collectors that don't play, the Bachs will be red rotted , the student horns aren't built like tanks. I just don't know. Maybe Yamaha is the future?

    I wish I had a crystal ball!

    If you play one, let us know what you think
     
  3. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    Rowuk,
    Are you saying that an artists creativity/individuality is limited by producers and the ilk? Not in the case that the public/consumer does this?


    ... I've never seen vintage yamaha trumpets, I guess they just dissapear or get worn down.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    What I am saying is that any farmer can tell you that monocultures are crap. Plant a forest of one single type of tree and one single type of bug can wipe out that whole forest. Diversity helps nature keep ahead. The same is true in music. The obsession with a "standard" sound makes the trumpet player in theory universally replaceable. Our jazz brothers have been pretty much immune to standardization. The classical world in the US has been essentially monoculture for 40 years. Yamaha with their Chicago and New York models is building better pine trees. I envision a "Boston, Chicago, New York, Vienna, Leipzig, Berlin sound that is appreciably different from one another. The Vienna, Leipzig, Berlin sounds are VERY individual. The US sounds are much closer to one another.

    If it were my section in the states, I would try and make a unique sonic statement instead of a different shade of pine. Boston was a good example for many years. Ghitalla did not play "standard" and Charlie Schlueter did not either.

    If we listen to the Gabrieli recordings with Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland, we hear how close the sounds of those great sections really was. I would have preferred more variation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2009
  5. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    I never thought a huge amount of yamaha horns as them necessarily being "divisivied". Alot of the models are built with a lot of resistance and ML-M bores. But I don't really have their whole line up memorized. Just what I tend to see.

    I thought you mean't something along the lines of the beauty of diversivication, even in music.
    I am sure that in the U.S., musical interpretations are found to be a lot similar; but that could be for any reason! My first guess is the spread of communication over long ranges made possible by technology; if musicians across the world shared thoughts and feelings on how to play, or how a piece should be played, then wouldn't that mean it would soon become narrower and down to a specific ideal?

    But that would be something that can only e told with time.
    What exactly makes an Orchestra, a good orchestra?
     
  6. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    What exactly makes an Orchestra, a good orchestra?[/QUOTE]




    A good orchestra,( any musical ensemble ), is great if, in the ears of the audience the sound is fulfilling and satisfying. This varies according to differing musical tastes, exposure over time, musical education, etc.. Another factor is history. In many cases, musical ensembles of yesteryear are either highly praised or condemned. This causes change in performance demands upon the artists and the acoustics of the house. Personal preferences of various review writers also have a profound effect on the opinions formed by the public,( audience ). My personal complaint on this subject is the 'sometimes' attrociously terrible musical selections made by the conductor. We are all aware of and familiar with the performences led by certain individual conductors because of our enjoyment of those performances. The rest fade into obscurity, and, for very good reason.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Any orchestra is good when they groove. You know, you get so into the music that you start tapping with your toes.

    The moving, musical experience does not require perfection. Even a school band can give me goosebumps (sometimes).

    If I am at a concert and am not happy I will leave. It doesn't matter how much the ticket costed. If the performance is not up to snuff, the money was wasted, I do not need to punish my ears in addition to wasting the money.
     
  8. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    I have been offered a Martin Committee 196xxx
    Can I get any information as to age and desirablility of "Committees" of this vintage

    I wasn't looking since I play my 50 year old Selmer with great gusto and enjoyment BUT I guess we are all the same, still looking for the "golden" horn
     
  9. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Or, maybe some of us just like to lay a bunch on the table during practice and see how quickly we can switch from one to another without missing any notes. And, my 50 year-old Selmer is right there with the rest of them and sounds better than most.
     
  10. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Kettle Falls, Washington
    I know someone who owns a Martin horn, It's an old vintage cornet. Plays really good.

    I wonder if this is what you guys are talking about.
     

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