Legatto tounging

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Blind Bruce, May 22, 2009.

  1. Blind Bruce

    Blind Bruce Pianissimo User

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    My teacher tried to get me to Legatto tongue yesterday. Everything I tried was either to stacatto or too soft.
    Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
    How about an exercize for it?
    Bruce in the Peg
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2009
  2. Firestas'1

    Firestas'1 Piano User

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    Has your teacher suggested you use any specific syllable? Most people have success in thinking "Du" rather than "Tu".
    Also, try playing the passage slurred at first then use the "Du" but very lightly as to just interrupt the airstream. Concentrate on blowing through the note not letting your air stop and pay attention to your sound.
    If you focus on your sound and have an idea of how you want to sound your body will usually find a way to prodce the sound desired almost automatically.
     
  3. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Firestas has given you very good advice. The only difference I have with him is uing Dah rather that Du.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    As stated above, legato playing is basically a "softly articulated slur." Keep your tongue relaxed (like it is melting in your mouth), blow like a slur, and articulate with some sort of "d" articulation, and keep the sound happening through the articulation.

    Have fun!
     
  5. Blind Bruce

    Blind Bruce Pianissimo User

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    Thanks guys. Teacher said to use "duh" and that is very clost to what you are saying. I will try harder.
    Bruce in the Peg
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Bruce,
    articulation is the art of making yourself understood. That applies to speech as well as the trumpet.

    My method of teaching articulation is to first get the player to play long tones WITHOUT using the tongue. Simply inhale and exhale, paying attention to the transition between the two states. It should be VERY smooth. No forced breathing - only relaxed. After a bunch of repetitions, we work on synchronizing the tongue with the onset of "exhale". Not with Duh, rather with Tooh.

    Legato means connected not soft. The tongue merely separates the notes with a quick motion. Many players have to resort to Duuh because they are too brutal with the Tooh. I find in the early stages, the more positive attack with a T is more beneficial to the development of articulation regardless if we are talking about staccato or legato. We need to get the same control over our tongue that we have over our chops.

    Eventually we need to get it all: tooh, teeh, taah, looh, leeh, laah, hooh, heeh, haah, dooh, deeh, daah, kooh, keeh, kaah, gooh, geeh, gaah, rooh, reeh, raah and EVERYTHING in between.

    The common denominator is the airflow. Legato means that there is little space between the notes. A very sharp knife will keep the space between the notes minimal.

    Before some of you pile on here, think about the notes that you crack. Mostly when "overachieving" with the tongue, or trying to enter softly. A duh is actually only useful when the chops speak immediately. Otherwise your sound does not start when YOU want it to. I teach long tones with no tonguing to learn how to get the tone started with minimal articulation. Needing the tongue to get the sound started is the second largest problem that I have to deal with.
     
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  7. SonicBlast

    SonicBlast New Friend

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    One of my old band teachers called something that sounds similar to this "soft tounging." are these the same thing?

    imo, very good advice up there. thanks.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The definition of "soft tonguing" by High school Band Teachers only means less brutal, less obnoxious.

    The heavy tonguing comes from poor breath support. The player then needs a hammer to get the lips moving.....................
     
  9. SonicBlast

    SonicBlast New Friend

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    well, this is my private teacher, which happened to be one of my old band teachers. and i think she was helping me prepare for international honour band (pretty much the equivalent of all state) so i'm pretty sure it wasn't just getting me to shut up a bit.
     

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