Lesson plans

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jude, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. someguy6

    someguy6 New Friend

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    Sep 8, 2006
    Cincinnati, OH
    You might want to consider purchasing Eric Bolvins, Arban Manual. You could work through the lesson plans in it with your teacher. He could make sure you do the exercises correctly and decide when you should progress.

    Each lesson is broken down into 5 or 6 sections.

    I also am a comebacker who found a teacher. I was also disappointed in the lack of structure I got. I ended up not continuing (because of the time commitments required). However, if I were to re-start with the same or different teacher, I would consider using the Arban manual to provide some structure.

    Best Regards and remember Festivus is Dec 23.
     
  2. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Verily I say unto thee it is a Festivus Miracle! (Otherwise known as a coincidence, I believe.) Today I agreed to swap a brand-new Chinese trumpet (with machined valves!) to my teacher for an old copy of Arbans. (The Local School District has standards. Bah!)

    I've heard about the Bolvin manual, and it seems a good idea - but isn't Festivus present-free? No matter, it's not too (very) late for Saturnalia. I'm sure that involves gift-giving. And receiving.

    Jude
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Mar 6, 2007
    Ithaca NY
    If one needed to be absolutely perfect there would be NO performers. Perfectionism is a fault. To paraphase an AA saying, we seek progress, not perfection. Make progress, risk embarrassment, let go of your self-importance, and have fun. If you are enjoying it so will your audience.
     
  4. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Just came across clips from a DVD by Warren Vache -
    History of Jazz Trumpet - ArtistshouseMusic.
    He has clips on method books, developing strategies and goals, jazz history, home recording ... I'll listen to anyone who can play like that talk about whatever he wants to.
     
  5. mrmusicnotes

    mrmusicnotes Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2007
    N.Y.C.
    Veery715,I to usually end my practice session with a couple of Jamey Aebersold and also play in a jazz group every Thursday Night.Are you sure your not my lost twin?
     
  6. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    That would be great! I have only sisters, feeling bereft despite their fine qualities. Welcome to the family, brothermusicnotes.
     
  7. bandman

    bandman Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2004
    Lafayette, LA, USA
    Jude,

    I’ve been teaching for many years (longer than some here have been playing) and some of the people here are going to get really upset with what I’m about to tell you. Remember that this is an opinion, based upon the fact that:
    1) I have an idea that you are already a pretty good player.
    2) I have the idea that you have the desire to be a pretty darn good hobby player.
    3) I think you sound like a nice person who has friends who fit the description of the player whom I’m about to describe.

    I don’t think you need a teacher, I think you need a friend or two that would be a good playing partner. I’m talking about a person (or 2) who would like to get together with you a few times per week and share trumpet playing.

    Adults can often help each other produce a practice pattern. You can watch each other, listen to each other, and play with each other in a manner where you both learn, and you both have fun. You can even establish practice patterns together that will help you both as a player, and you can push each other forward, with both encouragement, and the fact that you will have a regular practice time together.

    Playing the Selected Studied book, the Rubank duets, the Arban duets, and other exercises together is a fun way to practice, and you get better as you proceed through the books together. In high school I had several friends that took from the same teacher as me. We were never assigned the same lessons, but we practiced together, using our strengths to help each other progress. We did exercises together, and practice became fun!

    Think about this concept as a way for you to improve as a player, and the money you save by not paying your teacher can go toward that next new trumpet you want to buy!!!

    One last comment, I have been teaching for an eternity and I hate teaching adults, in fact I now just send them to a friend of mine instead of taking them on as students. Working with adults (people say 23-25 and older) just doesn’t work for some people. There’s nothing wrong with you, or your teacher if that is the case.
     
  8. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Hi bandman,

    Once again I'm blind-sided by the kindness of strangers...

    I've been thinking about your advice, which makes a lot of sense. Right now I really don't know how to classify my playing, but I think you're being generous in calling it "pretty good" - although I'm certainly better than I was a month ago. You're dead on about my goal, and I can see how what you suggest would help getting there.

    The only problem is that I'm newly back to this town and know almost no one here, certainly not anyone interested in playing elementary-to-intermediate trumpet. Actually, now that my teacher is beginning to be less nervous around me (I think he's afraid I'll start yakking and never shut up. For some reason.) this situation may end up very much like your suggestion, except that one of the players is a heck of a lot better than the other. Now that he knows what I really want from him is to provide a source to model my sound on and to have someone to play along with he's relaxing about what he should be "teaching" me. Maybe I should tell him, just blow, man?

    Adult comeback players have to take a more proactive role in their learning than I was expecting, or hoping - it takes more than simply showing up for lessons and practicing. (And it certainly must require a different skill-set on the part of the teacher faced with a student who expects to be treated like a colleague while sounding like a diligent 6th-grader.) There have been some excellent suggestions for comebackers wanting to work with a teacher offered here, and I'm planning on stealing a lot of them.

    With time - and some improvement in my playing - I imagine potential playing partners will magically appear and I'll be ready with your idea of getting together to work on stuff. In fact, I'm beginning to look forward to it.

    Thank you.

    Jude
     
  9. bandman

    bandman Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2004
    Lafayette, LA, USA
    I wish you lived here in Lafayette, LA because I'd love to play duets once a week with another adult JUST FOR FUN. Who knows, you may make a lifetime friend.

    I suggest you join a community band. That is a place where you find a playing partner, but also find that person with whom you can "yak your head off" with after rehearsal over a beer or two!

    One more option would be to go to the choir director at your church and offer to play at the Easter Service. Give him/her a very accurate description of your playing abilities, and tell him/her of your desire to find a partner to work with. You might end up playing for a secondary service (not the one with the big choir) but as time goes on this might become fun for you, and a church choir is a great place to make new friends.

    You can sing for the normal services/masses and then pull out your horn from time to time to add a special treat for the congregation. Playing for FREE is a lot different than what I do. You play for free and they are often willing to work with you on a part, or water it down if need be. In my case I walk in, play, and get paid. I better be able to play what they want me to play, and play it pretty darn well every time. It's not as much fun as "playing for fun" but it puts food on my table and helps to pay for my kids cellular phone!!!

    Good luck, and Merry Christmas!
     
  10. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Thanks to everybody who offered suggestions - since two Aebersold books showed up under the tree this morning, some of them I'll be able to start on immediately. Others will take some time to implement, and some I'll consider inwardly for a while.

    And Bandman, if you start a thread on the problems of teaching adult students/comebackers, we all - including the adult students - might learn something from it.

    Happy holidays to all and the best of wishes for the New Year/PF 2008.

    Jude
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2007

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