Let the collecting begin

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dBeav, May 12, 2013.

  1. dBeav

    dBeav Pianissimo User

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    So I have been bitten by the horn collecting bug. Now how to get started?
    Checking out eBay, it looks like one has to be very careful. A lot of stuff that's not what it appears. The stuff that is worthwhile? Well, it seems everyone else wants it too.
    So, found a secret honey hole (Goodwill) but alas, it's not such a secret and there are any number of sharks there too that swoop in and steal that "sweet deal" at the last minute.
    So I continue searching.
    The good news, I will probably meet a lot more of my neighbors as I hit every garage/yard sale I can find.

    Is there a cure for this affliction?
    Does my savings account stand a chance of surviving?

    (hoping to win my first auction in just a few hours. Luckily, the wife won't know about it until it's too late. muhahahahaha!)
     
  2. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    Have fun. We couldn't do this a short 10 years ago...... Well, not easily...:-)
     
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I have found the social aspect the most satisfying ... ... but you will have more trumpets than you can possibly play regularly soon enough.
    .. our wives always know ... always
     
  4. dBeav

    dBeav Pianissimo User

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    And so it begins..... just won an auction for a 1929 Pan American I'm both excited and fearful of what will become of me. :D
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    The N+1 disease can be lots of fun, but I'll give you one piece of unsolicited advice. If you're wanting to buy horns for your own use, don't waste money on cheap lower-level horns, unique old horns that "need work", or unknown brands. Chances are, they won't be good players, and you'll be stuck with your money invested in a bunch of wall-hangers. Better to save up your money and go for the more expensive, well-respected horns that are in good original condition. When the box arrives, you clean it if needed, oil it, and play (and enjoy) it.
     
  6. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    The cure is to not collect. If you won't play it, don't buy it.

    Tom
     
  7. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Heart of Dixie
    Let me add this...

    Way back in the dark ages, B.I. (before internet), finding unique/old horns was a challenge. Pawn shops, yard sales, junk stores, auctions, antique shops, etc. were the hunting ground. When you ran across something cool, you bought it. The brand, model, and condition (to a point) didn't really matter, because you might never see another one like it for sale. I accumulated a huge collection of horns, many of them worthy of the wall at Cracker Barrel. They played and/or looked like crap, but I enjoyed showing them to friends. I'd take them to a rehearsal to show them off, but playing them there was an exercise in futility. That's when it hit me - why spend my money on cheap "cool" horns that are really just lousy playing instruments? That's when I decided that if it wasn't a player, it wasn't a keeper, and I culled the herd.

    Now that the unique is commonplace on places like eBay, I've been able to find a few much better examples of horns I had previously owned but sold...horns that were once great instruments but were in such bad condition that they weren't worth restoring. Spending the money on a very nice original example of the same horn I used to own is satisfying, and there are still good deals out there on that type of instrument if you are diligent and patient. That's what I want to collect and play.

    Here's a good example:

    1925 Conn 22B I bought many years ago at an antique store. Never had seen one before, paid $125 for it. It had numerous dents, bad solder repairs, worn plating, mismatched bottom caps, chewed-up mouthpipe, etc. (but it did play well). Cost estimate to bring it back to its satin silver glory, about $600, so I never had it restored. I eventually sold it when I bought a nicer one.
    [​IMG]

    The nicer one: 1929 Conn 22B I bought on eBay about a year and a half ago. Paid $189 for it, including shipping. Almost perfect condition, plays like a dream. No expensive restoration needed, and it's original. It took a while watching eBay to find it at such a nice price, but the looking paid off. A keeper that will increase in value.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2013
  8. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    Good advice!
     
  9. Wondra

    Wondra Pianissimo User

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    +1 on what Dale said. I went through the same thing - bought, then sold some mediocre horns. Now I stick to horns that are in excellent, original condition. Good deals do come up on eBay from time-to-time. Sometimes mislabeled, other times with a low BIN. Other spots to look are the marketplace here and over at Trumpet Herald.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The "cure" is buying that first horn... then the next is easier... and after that...

    You're a Freekin Adict!
     

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