Let's talk about rotaries ... not Maznas .. trumpets

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    It's seems when I look into rotaries the good ones cost bank ... major coin ..
    I know zip about them ... tried one in a shop for a minute or two .. and that one cost 3 g's
    So anybody have some knowledge and experience with them .. I can't imagine every kid in Europe plays a three thousand dollar trumpet nor can I imagine they all play junk. A kid here in the states can find a really decent piston trumpet anywhere from $100 ( okay if they find a real deal) on up.
    Second question ... what is the deal with them ... sound and playability wise.
     
  2. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Well, coolerdave, you've come to the right shop here! As regards rotaries, there are a few generalities to note:
    1) All rotaries (even the upright ones like the Ganschhorn) are very tiring to hold and will take quite some time getting used to. Your left hand will likely be overstrained and overbent.
    2) Mute work will be very very difficult - no rotary comes with a pinky hook for the right hand (I had mine fitted with one, to overcome that problem).
    3) As to playing characteristics: All rotaries tend to be rather on the heavy side (you will need lots of air to get them to really sound good). Sound will generally be on the dark side.

    That's the downside.
    The upside has a few points too.
    1) Rotaries can be fitted with additional "help holes" to eliminate intonation problems for problem tones.
    2) With a rotary in hand, earning money with a trumpet will be much easier (many orchestras don't have rotaries, but will hire substitutes with rotaries at nice rates (at least, outside Germany and Austria!!)
    3) They have a much shorter valve distance, so fingering can be quite a bit faster.

    And now down to brass tacks - affordable quality rotaries:
    You COULD wait for a used Ganter or Monke to turn up. That will probably happen on a snowy 1st of August. Or you could try for a Yamaha rotary (they do a mid-range priced one specially for Austrian and German wind bands, quite a good instrument), or one from Miraphone. They are usually good to excellent, and still not too pricey.
    And if that's still too expensive you could - as an introduction - go for an Amati or Czerweny rotary. Well made, rather light in the tone for a rotary - a good conversion instrument!
    Tell me how you are getting on. If you experience any difficulty, I can put you in touch with a dealer who can send out an instrument from Austria.
     
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  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Thanks Barliman2001 ... I was hoping you would chime in on this. I am not sure I am currently in the market at this time. I had the impression that they might run more dollar wise in order to get the real benefit from them. The Votruba I played sure seemed like I had to use alot of air when I tried it. Considering it was a C instrument, that surprised me. I was hoping their might be a brand that was the Old's Ambassadors of rotories. Something that sounded decent enough. I at least know what to look for now.
    Are the majority of rotories in the key of C? This shop has 5 and 3 of them are in C.
    http://hornguys.com/menutpt.php
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  4. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Majority of rotaries are in Bb, specially the medium priced ones. Votruba certainly is one of the best quality makers there is... friendly guys, too (I know both of the brothers who run the business). As all Vienna rotaries, the Votruba is on the light side... Ganter, Monke, Miraphone are all quite a bit heavier. You might try for a Schagerl (but test the instrument properly, they tend to have consistency issues!) or a Lechner - but then you are in the top price range again...
     
  6. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    I got a rotary from ebay last year, $250, interesting horn, no makers name but very small letters on receiver Czecho-Slovakia, early 1920s, very small bore 0.420", large Bell 5 1/4", very easy blow, have not played it much, very sharp on D and C#. reputed to have come from Leblanc Co Museum.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I really appreciate you sharing your expertise on these. The biggest issue I have with picking one up is I know how it will go. If I go cheaper .. 30 days later I will not be happy and start looking for a better one. I was looking around a bit with some of the brand names you have mentioned in mind. That really helps as I have no idea what I am looking at. The Mahler sounded fabulous on the rotary.
    It looks like $1,200 is around where the quality starts to get better. I think trumpet players are spoiled. I couldn't touch a decent sax for double that price.
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Can I assume the tone isn't very dark and the over tones not very resilient on that Stuart?
     
  9. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Have not played it in about 6 months, not here at moment, will bring it back after Easter, from memory played quite bright.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  10. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    In the Mahler, the hooter looks very much like a Dowids or a Monke. In my previous post I forgot to mention Gerd Dowids of Munich (www.dowids.de) who makes a modular system rotary. You can adjust many playing characteristics; but unfortunately, you would go on a two years' waiting list and then have to go to Munich for a month or so to assemble your hooter according to your taste. And the hooter would set you back at least 3,000 bucks...


    That Ganter rotary is a G7, dating about 1985. One of the best years of that maker, though all of his stuff was and is good. Rotaries are best played with deep cup mpcs.

    And here's the ultimate in Mahler 5: Vienna Philharmonic (with Ganter rotaries at the time) conducted by Leonard Bernstein:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRy6CRHSBTw
    Enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
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