Level Horn, posture and shoulder strength

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    +1.

    Trumpets aren't heavy enough to give you the kind of left shoulder pain you get from wearing a heavy electric guitar on a strap for hours. It's not the weight, IMO, it's the grip. Tension in your grip holding the trumpet sends tension up your arm (where else is it going to go?:dontknow:). That's basic. Get a grip.

    Get a lighter grip. Switch to an Olds Recording and enjoy holding your trumpet without any of the TENSION you need to keep on that 3rd slide ring to keep it closed. No tension necessary .... you only apply a little when you want to work the slide. It may not seem like a lot of tension to keep the slide closed, but over time, you may be surprised, or end up with a sore shoulder. Try lipping everything for a while, quit using the slide (clamp or tape it shut) and let go of the ring. See if that eases up the left hand grip. You can hold it as lightly as you want, especially if your right thumb is where mine is ....... in between the 1st and 2nd valve, under the leadpipe. The right thumb in this place can take a lot of the weight off the left hand, so that, with the trigger, I can just lightly cradle it with the left.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
  2. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Thanks, I have been doing back extensions on one of those big exercise balls. It really helps, especially balancing the sit-ups I was diong before.

    Also during breaks in a song, I find it helps to lift the trumpet above my head and sort of wave it around.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    It sure doesn't help when you've once had a left rotor cup injury and then aged. At times I now brace my left elbow when practicing / playing with an adjustable T-bar stand (graphic artist's mahl stand). Still, an upright military posture helps me endure as well as a level trumpet habit from marching times. Next time I won't attempt the slide to home plate with my arm extended only to be suddenly stopped against the catcher's shoe, still he missed the throw and I scored, albeit we still lost the game.
     
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    You might want to take a visit to a physical therapist. Nothing like having an expert lay some eyeballs on you. I had some simple exercises that corrected my posture taking a lot of pressure off of a degenerate disk.

    Tom
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Tom, if you are referring to me, I seemingly have been around the block with orthopedists, neuro-surgeons, neurologists and days, weeks and months of physical therapy. I suppose I shouldn't complain as I no longer sit in a wheel chair or wear custom orthopedic braces and the pain is lessened considerably, yet not totally. I have been able to swim the backstroke recently for 500 meters and that is post heart surgery.
    Pain meds have no curative quality, they only mask the pain from the brain, yet I do have Rx for some of them and minimize their usage as such are labeled "Take as Needed". 30 pills average me for 3 to 6 months to use up. Just don't expect me to now play any sports again. Thanks for your concern.
     
  6. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    No, Ed, the original poster.

    Tom
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    For the OP. The way you hold the horn with you left hand can cause problems. In addition to having too tight a grip. Bending your wrist may cause problems. This puts the weight of the horn on the wrist. While holding the horn look at your left hand. The line from you thumb to your fore arm should be a straight line. This puts the weight on the shoulder muscles. Everything should be relaxed. You don't need to grip the horn. It can sit on you forefinger, palm and thumb.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    +1. And, if your right hand position puts your thumb UNDER the leadpipe, in between the 1st and 2nd valve, fully half the weight of the horn can be on the right hand (thumb). If you can balance the weight between both hands ...... you're in business IMO.:thumbsup:


    Turtle
     

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