Lincoln Portrait

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Joe44, Nov 22, 2011.

  1. Joe44

    Joe44 Pianissimo User

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    In a few months our high school band is playing Copelands Lincoln Portrait. We sight read it today it sounds like a great piece. My band director says that we will have seeting auditions chosen by how we play our part (in an audition setting). I currently play third trumpet due to my last audition for this band (needless to say, it was bad.) It seems odd to audition with the third trumpet part. Any sugggestions with the piece or audtions in general?
     
  2. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Not familiar with the piece, but you can try to find a professional recording and listen to it, to see the styling.

    For auditions in general you must try to remain calm and relaxed. Stay in the moment, and play with emotion.
    Prepare the piece THOROUGHLY. This means not just notes and rhythms, but precise articulations (staccato, legato, accents) and DYNAMICS. Often times in high school, when auditions come around, students just prepare and make sure they can play the notes. If you can show that you have musicianship, you can have an edge.

    You mentioned in another post about using a 14a4a for everything, and wanting to begin use of a deeper cup. I believe this will be advantageous, not only because your lips not swell as much, but it should help your tone color to be correct for concert band and encourage a full tone and proper air usage.

    Best of luck
     
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I am guessing he chose the third part for a variety of reasons. One was probably so everyone had a chance to actually be able to play it. You couldn't just guess the melody and would have to read it. perhaps the valve combinations are trickier as well.
    As far as auditions go, if your practice routine is more difficult than anything you have to perform and you work up killer sight reading chops .. well that's half the battle.
     
  4. Joe44

    Joe44 Pianissimo User

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    Well, the firsts audition with the first part second with second parts, I just happen to be third trumpet.
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Wow, that doesn't make much sense. He won't be able to tell how the lower parts sound in the range of the first part. As well, tuning and fingerings are easier on the first part... He should audition everyone on second IMO.

    Anyways, coolerdave is right about sightreading, most auditions require it.

    In preparing for an audition, make sure that you aren't missing anything (accidentals, strange rhythms). Ask people to listen to you play, what you could do better. And aim for a good sound, regardless of what the part has you do.
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I played 2nd part on it a couple years ago. It's somewhat difficult, if I remember correctly, mainly for the multiple meter changes and having to synch with the narrator.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    A C-major scale often tells me everything that I need to know about players. Rhythm, tone, demonstrating musical expression does not need virtuosic repertory.
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    You can tell how well he can handle tonguing in the upper registers of the first part, for example? Interesting.

    NewFriend - like was mentioned, one challenge of playing that piece you might have is following the conductor, since he will be following the narration at times and you've got to be ready to follow him (e.g. the conductor), although I would be surprised if the band director would be conducting all of you individually during the audition. Another might be hearing and playing wider intervals than you are used to playing. I've conducted Copeland and been really surprised at times at how much trouble certain players have had in passages I wouldn't have thought were problematic, and it's because of the fingering of these wider intervals. They're not inherently difficult, just unfamiliar for many inexperienced players.

    Regarding the auditions themselves, are you clear on what your band director meant? Was he meaning that you are auditioning for any seat in the entire section, or seating within your section - I mean part, e.g. Trpt I, Prpt II etc.? Also regarding the audition, is this for your band director alone, and are you comfortable playing for him or do you get a case of nerves?
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2011
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Given your resume.. I bet you can too:D
     
  10. Joe44

    Joe44 Pianissimo User

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    Audition is for any seat in the entire section. I am really determained to get out of 2nd to last trumpet (out of 12 I played really bad the last audition) I guess you didn't read my post entitled frustration. It is only with the band directer and yes I get really nervous in auditions.
     

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