lip problems

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by equivariant, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 12, 2009
    Miami, Fl
    I would say to contact a dermatologist, a dentist typically would not have a background on treating ulcers as much as their impact. And an ulcer is a cold sore in a sense, caused by a viral infection, not irratation from a sharp tooth.
     
  2. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    What may actually be happening is that you are biting or folding the inside of your lip in a way that makes it swell, creating what looks and feels like an ulcer. If the spray stops working, you'll know whether it's the mouthpiece or you.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Instead of always thinking worst case, I try to go through the logical, repeatable easys that don't cost much or involve changing basic habits.

    Let's see where the disinfection route goes. Of course we can document the ugliest things imaginable, keeping it simple often leads to better results. It is my experience that most people, if they expect cancer do NOT go to the doctor. They don't want to know. They will run around and look for substitute symptoms to hide the truth.

    The same is true here. If we jump in to the deep end of the pool first, we can scare the player into not doing anything.

    Disinfecting will not hurt anything and will solve MANY irritation problems with the mouthpiece.
     

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