Lips after playing Loudly

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    After playing loudly for a period of time, my lips seem dry/somewhat rubbery. Also they feel "hot", like there was much friction.

    Is this a bad thing? Or can someone explain why the lips do this? I can only hypothesis that perhaps I need more hydration.

    Thanks
    Mark
     
  2. Glennx

    Glennx Pianissimo User

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    Dunno about 'rubbery', but the hot feeling surely must be from increased blood flow, particularly after playing loud for a moderate-to-extended period. I wouldn't worry about this; the body is directing more blood to an area that has been under some strain and compression. You want this so the tissue can receive oxygen and waste to be carried away (is it lactic acid that is responsible for muscle fatigue? I forget)

    On the other hand if your lip feels hot and swollen to the point where your playing is noticeably diminished, then you may want to check your breathing, air flow & support and mouthpiece pressure.

    Hope this is helpful.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It's not likely good. Hot means increased blood flow. This is a response to demand from stress. If it stops here, it's OK, but it is a sign to back off. If, however, at this stage you start loosing accuracy, then you are STARTING to do damage, and it is time to put the horn down for the day.

    FORGET the hydration factor. At this stage from what you describe, dehydration is NOT a factor. YOU HAVE TO LOOSE 3% OF YOUR BODY WEIGHT BEFORE MUCOSAL MEMBRANES (lips) START SHOWING SIGNS OF DEHYDRATION.
     
  4. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Thanks both. Is there any way I can develop the lips so that this doesn't happen as soon, or is there a stress limit for my lips that simply won't change?
    I had also played some previously, but not enough to be concerned. Probably about two hours through the day before that (easy day today).

    My lip was not swollen, if that helps, and my mouthpiece pressure wasn't very bad. I just was noticing the feeling, thankfully my playing was still fine.
     
  5. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Is this during marching band?
     
  6. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Yes, marching/pep bands. When the f/ff's come. I try not to overblow. Typically I'm staying in a C4-C5 range now. (In staff, to above)
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Personally, I hate marching band.. and everything about it. I am sure the horn bouncing around on your chops is not doing you any favors ( you should try that in New York in the winter on a frozen football field...fun). Maybe someone else here as some tips how to do that.
     
  8. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    As Music Ed majors they require us to do a semester of it. I dislike it very much too --- too much loud playing, your lips get mutilated, and with the mouthpiece moving around you never get a consistent set. I think it's hindered my improvement greatly. Trust me, I've already promised my teacher I won't be doing it again --- gladly.

    All I plan to be participating in, in the future, is orchestra, concert/symphonic bands, jazz band, and small ensembles. Which is why I've become more concerned with control and less with range. Strange feeling ROFL
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    What is the problem? Any exhiliarating physical activity leaves some part of the body with a "special" feeling. Treasure it. It is proof of having done something worthwhile.

    Naturally, if we are building great power and endurance, the road will be bumpy. No need for a case of cyberchondria however.

    When getting better, it is first the lips, then the face muscles then the muscles surrounding the breathing apparatus that get "sore". If your whole body doesn't hurt after playing a pep rally, then you are not giving 100%. That BIG breath and facial activity keeps you from using too much pressure.
     
  10. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Horns don't bounce if the proper marching form is used.
     

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