Long term Trumpet storage

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by larrygk, Sep 17, 2012.

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  1. larrygk

    larrygk Pianissimo User

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    Have 2 of the same horn and want to store one if them long term. I thought about after thorough cleaning to store it completely apart. Maybe put slides in and parts in separate air-tight baggies and grease them up to prevent corrosion. Same with valves with oil. Seems like this might be better than typical clean, grease, oil and put together where over time things can get stuck, etc.. Also have a good air-tight bag for the horn itself.
    Ideas?
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    I like what you said, plus maybe add some of those silica-gel sachets to absorb any moisture while stored.

    I usually do what you said, take it apart, clean, dry, grease and oil (not vaseline) - use Ultra-pure synthetic oil, then assemble, and throw a couple of silica bags into the trumpet case. The silver plate can tarnish, but usually all OK. Vaseline dries, and some oils do dry and valves get stuck if stored.
    Good luck
     
  3. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    I would say yes to everything you mentioned except for putting the trumpet in an air tight bag, I would want the trumpet to e able to dry out inside its tubing.
     
  4. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    Send it to me, I will store it. Better yet, I will play it 4 times a week!
     
  5. larrygk

    larrygk Pianissimo User

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    Cincinnati
    Oooooh, no. I love my Paris-Selmer Chorus 80J's too much! I'm storing the 2007 Matte finish one and playing the 2011 lacquer one daily. Ya, know...they don't make them anymore.
    Anyway, thanks for the tips guys.
     
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  6. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Personally, I would disassemble it, clean every inch of it, put the horn and the slides in tarnish retardant bags and the valve parts in cloth bags. Each valve should be wrapped in acid free paper to protect it from damage. No lubricant. No valve oil, no slide lubricant--that way you don't have to worry about it hardening or evaporating. No plastic on your horn at all. Silica gel is a must, but it doesn't last forever--change or recondition every couple of months. If you don't want to disassemble the water key assemblies a drop of light machine oil should prevent any rusting of the spring and a piece of acid free paper should protect the water key "cork". If it really is cork you should protect it with a coat of cork grease too.
     
  7. larrygk

    larrygk Pianissimo User

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    Excellent. My tendancy was to disassemble, and will do as you suggested. No sure what a tarnish retardant bag is, however.
     
  8. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    They're made of "silver cloth", the same stuff that's used to line silver chests. Lots of variations are available, but the best I've found are sold by John Ogilbee, who's a trumpet guy and one of the U.S. distributors of Taylor trumpets. His are sturdier than most, made with an outer layer of something along the lines of suede cloth. He has them in various sizes (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, occasionally piccolo trumpet), and they're a very effective way to fight tarnishing on silver or gold plating. You can contact him at:

    [email protected]

    (No affiliation, etc.; I've just bought a lot of his fine bags and a couple of his horns)
     
  9. larrygk

    larrygk Pianissimo User

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    Cincinnati
    Thanks- I will contact John. On a similar but unrelated topic (speaking of tarnish) has anyone found a method of protection to reduce wear spots from your hands on horns. In the case of the Paris Selmer's while I love the horn, their plating appears thin and it wears pretty fast where your fingers/palm/hands touch over time.
    I will literally wear thin cloth white gloves when I practice especially in hot weather but that is a bit weird admittedly. WOnder if you guys have found or bought a solution to this. I use a different type of valve cover which wraps up under the leadpipe, and to part of the 3rd valve pipe etc, so the valves are not an issue.
     
  10. larrygk

    larrygk Pianissimo User

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    Jan 7, 2012
    Cincinnati
    John responded quickly. Here is his link:

    Trumpet Safe Bag in Suede w/ Anti-Tarnish Lining - NEW | eBay
     

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