Losing that Sense of Awe

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gzent, Aug 30, 2005.

  1. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    What I have found is that the "awe" factor has changed over the years.
    Consider this - when you first heard somebody playing Carnival of Venice, you probably had the same sort of reaction as every other young student "wow, that's incredible, how can anyone play like that." As you progress, you discover that it is a playable piece (not easily playable, but playable), so the mere feat of getting through it with all the notes intact loses the "awe" factor.

    At the ITG this year there were some amazing technical performances, yet the players who had the "awe" factor for me were not those that dazzled us with technical virtuosity, but those that played with sheer musicality (for those interested - Ed Tarr and Dave Hickman). Only a short number of years ago I would have put someone like Jens at the very top of the pile, purely for his superhuman feats of technical mastery, yet my tastes have changed.
    Please don't get me wrong - Jens is a masterful player (nice guy too) who plays with an amazing amount of musicality, but the simple beauty of Ed and Dave's playing blew me away.

    Jens had me thinking "oh ****, I'll have to work hard to even think of playing like that"
    The previously mentioned had me thinking "nobody else will ever play like that"

    It takes something different to hit the "awe" button now, but is definitely still possible.
     
  2. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Des Moines, IA
    I used to have this problem. I am forever reminding students to not be judgemental, but just enjoy the sound. It hit me that every performance I attended I viewed with a critical eye. I decided maybe I should practice what you preach, so I have learned to filter out the bad sound system, the too loud guitar, the sax player scooping every other note. I now concentrate on the good points. If there aren't any, I leave. :cool:
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Speaking of being bored by technical mastery, for those of you who know guitar players, two words: Yngwie Malmsteen.

    Technically, the guy is off the planet, but I get bored of it in less than 5 minutes.

    I'd much rather hear Carlos Santana - he just knows how to place things and while he has chops, he chooses to go musical rather than technical.

    These days, technique and range don't inspire me - sound and musical nuance does.
     
  4. FlugelFlyer

    FlugelFlyer Piano User

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    Palos Park, IL

    +1,000,000,000,000,000,000 points, welcome to the bonus round!!!
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    GZ,

    I think it's so simple, you've overlooked something.

    Over the last ten years, you've improved as a player and the things that fascinated you earlier are things that are much more in your technical and musical grasp than before. You have higher standards and it takes more from a regional group to make you "ooh" and "ahh" the way we did when we were less experieinced.

    ML
     
  6. Bob Odneal

    Bob Odneal Pianissimo User

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    Houston, Texas
    I have known Doc since 1967 since I was a kid and he would solo with the R.E.Lee High School band in Baytown, Tx. I still get goose bumps when I hear him live after not hearing him in a while. He is one of the reasons I still play.

    I hoated a Destino Day in Houston when he was in town with the symphony. I ended up with a Destino. It's a great horn.

    Manny, you sound great on those Monette clips!!!! Very cool!

    Bob
     
  7. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Bob,

    How does that Destino play for you? What did you switch from?


    Manny,

    Yes, I can see what you're saying. Hearing you play live up close, and then getting to toot that Monette Eb, that was ccertainly and 'awe' evening for me.

    When was a recent 'awe' moment for you?

    Greg
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Wow...

    I have to be honest and say that Doc's playing is always something that I look forward to because of how inspired I get when I hear him play. He combines an incredible passion in his playing with a solid technique. He would probably tell you that double tonguing is a little more elusive than it was twenty years ago but, geez... he's amazing and not because of his age as many like to point out. Just because he's a complete performing artist and his sound always sings from the heart.

    That's what I listen for: the heart in the sound, Greg. The most awe-inspiring live performance I've heard recently was Wynton at "Brilliant Corners" jazz club a couple of years ago. I even joined Trumpetherald so I could write about it, it affected me so. Wynton Marsalis played with his heart so connected to his lips and fingers it was as though I could read his mind as he played.

    That's why I don't go as crazy over some of the players that are spoken about so much these days. There's an incredible amount of technique and whizbang playing, stuff I'll never be able to do but what can I say? It doesn't touch my heart the way those gentlemen I mentioned do. When Maurice Andre used to come through here it was the same thing. Phenomenal technique and passion that took you up to a new place. Yoyo Ma played a Don Quixote that left me speechless it was so heartfelt and gorgeous. I know you asked about recent musical events but you make me think about some fantastic things I've been privileged to be a part of.

    Anyways, thanks for the question.

    ML
     
  9. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Cool.

    I haven't been lucky enoug to hear Wynton live. Does he ever appear in these parts?

    Greg
     
  10. Bob Odneal

    Bob Odneal Pianissimo User

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    Houston, Texas
    The Destino plays great! Great CORE to the sound and the note connection between intervals is amazing!!! It is sloted, but not so slotted it is ridged. The horn really projects and has a beautiful sound and great valves.

    The previous horn I was playing was an older Schilke B6-L with the new solid silver bell and the valves have been aligned by Bob Reeves. I have been playing that for years and was a Shilke clinician. It was my favorite and I used to play it with a beryllim bell. The silver added more core and projection but was very expensive ($600)!!! They make their silver bells thinner than a lot of companies.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    MAURICE ANDRE!!!

    I only got to hear him live once in at the Trumpet Symposium in Denver in 1972 and WOW!!! What passion and sound. I thought that Selmer pic would explode and if you ever heard him you would know what that I mean. I saw/met Bill Chase, Bud Brisbois, Dizzy, Lew Soloff and many other cats at that hang. What a thrill for a college student from Texas.

    Almost as thrilling as meeting John Wayne on the set of the HELL FIGHTERS in my hometown of Baytown, TX when I was in high school.

    Manny's John Wayne picture brought that to mind.

    Oh, by the way, I am the one on the left. :roll:

    [​IMG]
     

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