Lost nearly an octave of range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hornlife98, Dec 26, 2014.

  1. Hornlife98

    Hornlife98 Pianissimo User

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    Remember, everyone, that everything that I "forced" in the videos (I did; admit it.) have been within my normal capabilities for a year.

    That being said, there is quite a bit of advice that I need to digest, so I will refrain from posting unless there is a question directed at me. I will post again in a week or two with any progress.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Lack of air (breathe from diaphragm) and tons of pinching with lips for tip of the iceberg starters. Lips should not be what holds air back. Ideally the diagram doesn't send excess air causing rush hour traffic, but rather just the right amount. The tongue should be there to shape the air stream past the NOT PINCHED lips. Don't worry, it's only a life long pursuit of getting better! 8)
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    The diaphragm is used for inspiration mainly, together with the external intercostal muscles. Expiration is accomplished by the elastic recoil of the rib cage, internal intercostal muscles and abdominal muscles.

    Here I am now, understanding exactly Rowuk and Seth's feelings... :lol:
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Staying well clear of this one, Philippe. Just over a year since everything above in-stave D deserted yours truly. Even with the best of guidance, it's a long road back.
     
  5. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    Hey man, go to my website, Glory Horn | John Francis trumpet playing blog and then to "downloads." There is one called "1930". It is and article written by a guy who had the same problem and how he conquered it with long tones. Give it a read and a try! Til then, try not to freak.

    Blessings!
     
  6. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    I was keeping it simple, my mistake around here as I know better. So, think of your diaphragm, abdominals, floating ribs, and duadinum (j/k on last) as a role of toothpaste. Roll it up from the bottom baby.

    In person lesson still recommended, just some basics here to get into the habit of while relaxing and playing. Don't be mentally defeated before you know you're going to play higher either.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This may not be the right time for this answer, but the lips actually do hold the air back when they are free to do their job. You see, when we play with pressure, we lock the ability of the lips to open and close to one single position that may be good for one note. All other notes suffer because the aperature can't change. Efficient playing means getting more sound from the same effort. The lips and tongue are the air pressure regulators. Controlled practice with lipslurs and longtones synchronizes the tongue and lips.

    As I have often said, the internet is not a very good place for detailed analysis of a trumpet players state. There are so many facets to body use that require on site attention. Maybe for a simple practice monitoring or advice on articulation/embellishment the internet can provide a fast solution, but my experience is that what is generally reported is a symptom, not the root problem.
     
  8. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    We'll agree to disagree, ah this is our favorite dance haha!
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There is nothing "not to agree" with. We cannot change the air pressure applied by our abs "per note". Those muscles have no fine motor skills and the flexibility of the lung tissue prevents anything "accurate" happening there. Controlled air pressure is the very basis of producing sound. Bad things to limit pressure are upper body, vocal chords, posture and armstrong. Good things are tongue and lips (aperature). There is NOTHING ELSE.
     
  10. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

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    I know this is totally not gonna sound professional but think of playing horn like driving a stick shift car...If you let out the clutch too early yer gonna stall...If you give it too much gas you'll burn up the clutch. But if you get it just right, getting up a big hill with only a few minor hiccups.
     

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