Low pitch to high pitch .... why?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have watched this long enough.

    Pitch was actually determined by the pipe organs. Any of you that have had a chance to see a real one, see stops that are labeled 2', 4', 8', 16', 32'. A natural trumpet in C is 8' long for instance. Soooooooooo, the C determined the A, the math is simple and now you know better!

    This means that a well tempered A is different than a mean tone A,

    How big a foot is, was unfortunately standardized at about the same time that pitch was.................
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    How about this to throw in here, I have heard and I think read here that if there is some big shot player playing with a symphony that the symphony will tune to that player. I am talking about someone like Maurice Andre or someone like him. Is that true?
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Reputedly (and I've been unable to find a corroborated evidential finding of such) two Scots in the military were down to three rounds of ammunition between them, yet captured a unit of Germans by continually circling them while blowing their pipes. IMO, if true, they must have been playing a piobracht.

    Well, for sure, tall tales are told at Scottish games. I've kilted attire and a practice chanter, and the latter is infuriating. Perhaps it was that I never drank enough Scotch to get drunk. However, I've never been able to play pipe music on a brass instrument. I suppose that is so because brass instruments have no goose or drones and can't skirl. A = 440, forget it with bagpipes.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Whatever the director / conductor wants, the players do ... or else.

    Certainly if I could have tuned to blend with Maurice Andre's I'd consider my playing to be fabulous even if I were assigned to 3rd, or 4th parts. Betcha he would have appreciated it also!
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Agreed. If they pitched them lower, they might not be so grating on the ears. I will say, however, that if the thing is a mile away or more, they sound pretty nice.

    I'm off to the Shed, to try another morning of playing guitar and singing songs at A=432. I did 3 hours yesterday morning, it was remarkable. That small adjustment made it easier to sing every song in my list that I got to (around 30 or 40). My voice was louder, richer and everything was easier, even the stuff that's marginal, that I wouldn't do in public.

    There's something to it, a change of frequencies for a singer, that opens up the voice. Singers are probably the ones behind the (gaining momentum) movement to change the standard to 432.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Never in my career. The oboe in the orchestra ALWAYS gave the tuning pitch - even for the soloist. The only exception is when pianists bring there own pianos. If there is not enough time for the piano to acclimate to the room, the orchestra will retune just for the piece with the piano.

    Maurice André was often in Germany and tuned to A=443 - I was there. Bobby McFerrin also sings A=443 when he is accompanied by a german orchestra. Netrebko does and Pavarotti did too.

    The top musicians that probably COULD get pitch written into their contract don't need to. A couple of hertz is no issue.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Excluding a symphony orchestra, it is very rare for any other orchestra to have an oboeist. I was once told that for a piano to acclimate, even if already on stage, for a performance that it needed 4 hours under full stage lights and HVAC.

    My Mom acquired a pre-owned 11' Steinway Grand that had been on stage and was restored. Too, that was when we first got air conditioning in our house. Also, 4 reflector ceiling potlights over the piano were installed. When we had company, and she played it, we also had to move her Baldwin folded spinet piano out of the living room to our country kitchen as it would sympathize.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    If you're not playing in a symphony or a big band, or some other large group of players, you can decide for yourself what concert pitch will be. It's still a free country. After another bout of singing at A=432 I have a whole new theory:

    The human voice, the vocal chords, the ONLY musical instrument not manufactured to any agreed upon "concert pitch", has it's own vibrational set of slots, where they resonate the easiest and the fullest. A=440 is off the beam for the voice .... which, frankly, IMHO, should have been the ONLY consideration when coming up with this arbitrary agreed upon (at least by most) designation for the note A. Any other way of coming up with it is just plain dumb. ALL other musical instruments (except for the human voice) can be ALTERED IN MANUFACTURING.

    See my point?


    Turtle
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Save your ears, if you are close to bagpipes, by using sound suppressant ear plugs. I neglected to do so just once. However, I've heard them at least 1.000 times including the massed clans on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh Scotland and at numerous Scottish games here in the USA. A lone piper walking the parameters of a cemetery playing Amazing Grace or Going Home at a funeral gets as much respect as a bugler sounding TAPS. Tradition has it that a piper walked the parapets of a caslle playing the pipes when the laird of the castle died. The RCA recording of Amazing Grace performed by the pipes, drums and military band of the Royal Scots is a treasure IMO. I'm particularly impressed by the Trumpet Carrilion they play on this recording. The Royal Scots are now amalgamated with the Welsh Carabiners to form the British 2nd Armored Division.
     
  10. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

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    This thread has done nothing but inspire me to find a period rotary horn that I can't afford. I think low frequecny might be the work of the devil. Have you noticed most kids today ride around in cars blasting low frequecny pulse tones in rap music?

    Do bad neighbrohoods promote low frequency augmentation? Do higher achievers attain greatness with bright music?

    Thanks for the reading material Rowuk... I think i'll try how equal temperament tuning ruined harmony.
     

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