lung capacity

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dizforprez, Sep 28, 2004.

  1. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    I have been toying around with the Voldyne lately and find that my total lung capacity is 3.5 liters, where as given my age and height it should be around 5 liters.

    It would seem that at age 26 I am playing the trumpet with the lungs of a 65 year old man.

    Would exercsies be able to increase the capacity to back around where it "should " be? or are there some people whos capacity doesnt match the chart?

    http://windsongpress.com/breathing devices/Use_Devices.htm
     
  2. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    35
    602
    1
    Sep 26, 2004
    Halifax, NS CANADA
    Hi

    I wouldn't read all that into it. Although Arnold Jacobs is absolutely, without a doubt, one of the greatest teachers, I still believe that it is all relative.

    I don't know, stop me if I'm wrong, but I thought you only need between 2.5 and 3 to play a brass instrument. My capacity is 4. But I too, have been playing round with this device for a couple days now. I figue that your lungs may not be used to stretching like they recently have been. When I first started playing with this device, I only had about a 3 and within the last couple days I made it up to 4 and then kept it there. Like anything, it involves practice.

    Also, are you sitting or standing? or do you smoke? or are you fully exhaling your air? Think of the absence of air as a state of tension and then the big huge breath is the relief.

    I hope this helps
    Cheers
    Eric S.
     
  3. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    I don't believe physical exertion has anything to do with it. My brother and I were both tested back in HS, and both of us tested at around 5.5 liters, first try. This is interesting, as I'm fairly physically active, and he abhors any kind of exercise. So that certainly can't be the factor.
     
  4. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    Well the reason I mention exercise is because in a master class by Arnold Jacobs he mentions weight as being a determining factor in capacity, but no where in the chart is the affect of weight on lung capacity stated( that I saw). If you are a few pounds over ( as I am and by the way i dont smoke) I am hoping its affect the amount you can take in. That would mean I can regain some of what I ‘should’ have by shedding a few pounds, but that is again assuming I have a 5 as a max capacity. I am able to keep the little good, better best indicator very smoothly in the best area and I don’t feel like tension or posture problems are messing up the reading. I feel that is a pretty true statement of my capacity. My max is 3.5 to 4, my average for playing is around 2 to 2.5. Right now it might not be that big of a deal, but in 10 or 15 years I could have a BIG problem if I state to lose off of what I have now.


    thanks for the replies so far.

    Any one else have a take on this?
     
  5. pops

    pops Pianissimo User

    70
    8
    Mar 17, 2004
    Dallas
    I have an adult student who was at 3.75

    And he had a hard time with his range.

    After a month of sit-ups and running he is at 5.5 and has a 5th more usable range.

    The lungs don't grow but you get to where more of what you have is being used and in a more efficient manner.

    When my breathing is bad (asthma) and at 5.0 or below I have about an octave of range loss. Plus the sound quality is NOT what I am used to.

    Trumpet is a wind instrument and we need to support it well.
     
  6. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Pops, maybe you can also confirm something I was told, about how when we inhale, if we try to breathe from "the bottom " of the lungs, our capacity increases. It seems to work somewhat, but it might be an illusion.
     
  7. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Big Aggie, what increases is the 'functional' lung capacity when you are using you're diaphragm to breath. As a Respiratory Therapist for 20 years, I could always find the swimmers, players of wind instruments and singers because their lung capacity would be about double of predicted. This is because they knew how to breath!


    Gee Pops, I feel for you as I'm an asthmatic too! I've been struggling with bronchitis and asthma for the last week but I'm getting to where I can play again..........:)
    Bill
     
  8. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    been doing a little more reading on this subject.

    turns out that the full vital capacity as stated on the chart can only be reached with the lungs out side the body. i dont think i want to try that. :lol:

    i have some medical text books to read on the subject, but as always time is limited. i will let you guys know if i find out any more info that might be helpful to any one here.
     
  9. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Here's an interesting note--but please don't try this! If you were to take the average pair of lungs out of the body and unfold them, the surface area is about equal to a tennis court!

    Bill
     
  10. djm6701

    djm6701 Pianissimo User

    You aren't playing with the lungs of a 65-year old man. Aging creates other problems, mainly around losing elasticity which makes it more difficult for a 65-year old with the *same* capacity as you have to breath in and out.

    Remember that capacity is the same as bow length for a string instrument - the more air you take in the longer phrase you can play.
     

Share This Page