lung capacity

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dizforprez, Sep 28, 2004.

  1. Annie

    Annie Piano User

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    Nov 13, 2003
    It doesn't matter how much, it's how you use it!
     
  2. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    well yes and no.

    you have to have some basic amount to play the horn. :wink:

    I think there were many cases were Arnold Jacobs would help older pros that were "losing thier lips" due to lost capacity regain what they had lost.


    so far my reading has turned up that the average male has a 3.5 liter inspiratory capacity and that nearly 2 liters remain in the lungs after breathing out when dealing with normal expiration.

    source: page 482 Textbook of Medical Physiology, Guyton and Hall 9th ed. 1996
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "I have been toying around with the Voldyne lately and find that my total lung capacity is 3.5 liters, where as given my age and height it should be around 5 liters.

    It would seem that at age 26 I am playing the trumpet with the lungs of a 65 year old man."


    Diz etc.,

    I'm not completely convinced you're using the Voldyne properly, assuming you don't have asthma or bad habits like smoking.

    Many people,when they first do this, have their abdomen in a greater state of tension during the inhale than they might be aware of. Folks who are really well built and have well defined ab muscles tend to not allow the abdomen to engage in the normal expansion that's part of an inhalation. They don't like the flabby feel that accompanies a complete inhalation so they stay tense during the time they should be relaxed!

    See if that might be happening and then relax the next time you try. I figure it's worth mentioning.

    ML
     
  4. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Mr. Laureano,

    When I inhale I can push in on my stomach, I feel that it is pretty loose for the most part. Once I start to get to my full capacity things start to tighten up but I feel that is from the fact that I am getting full. I also checked my neck and shoulders but seem pretty loose there as well.

    From that information do you feel like I am to tense or are there other indicators I should be considering?

    Thanks,

    Jason
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "Mr. Laureano,

    When I inhale I can push in on my stomach, I feel that it is pretty loose for the most part. Once I start to get to my full capacity things start to tighten up but I feel that is from the fact that I am getting full. I also checked my neck and shoulders but seem pretty loose there as well.

    From that information do you feel like I am to tense or are there other indicators I should be considering?

    Thanks,

    Jason"

    Dear Jason,

    It's always hard to tell because what a person perceives from within (as you have ) is often different what an observer would notice from without.

    Nevertheless, what occurs to me is that in order to get an accurate read on what your true vital capacity is, you need to get on the other kind of spirometer that measures your exhalation rather than the inhalation. The reason I say that is because you'll be freer to take a complete breath without the self-examination that's going on when you use an incentive spirometer like the Voldyne meter.

    My suggestion is the following:

    For now, forget about measuring and stand or sit comfortably. Take in a large breath and relax as you hold it. Sip in a bit more and relax. Keep doing that until you are as full as you can be but still relaxed (not shaking and sputtering). Then let go.

    Wait a minute and repeat until you don't have to sip more than twice before you reach that maximum fill level. That is, your initial inhalation should be larger everytime you try it.

    When you go to play, get as close to the maximum fill level on one breath and one breath only with no tension. Before you play there should be no gap between the end of the breath and the start of the note.

    The end of the breath is the start of the note. No gap. No hitch.

    I'm betting that if you're able to understand what I wrote and implement it you find plenty of success. Your sound should be fuller and more relaxed. You should feel that you have plenty to use as fuel.

    Don't forget the music!

    ML
     

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