making a Bach more Bachy

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by sleight, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. sleight

    sleight New Friend

    17
    0
    May 20, 2010
    What can be done to make a Bach Strad 180 37 bell 5 yrs old sound more like a Mt Vernon Bach? Megatone mouthpiece? Heavy valve caps? change of tuning slide perhaps? New lead pipe?
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

    3,418
    373
    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    How does a Mount Vernon Bach sound? Does it sound different a NY Bach or an Elkhart Bach. Tell me what you hear!
    Wilmer
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    And who is playing it? Does a horn have a sound, or does a player have a sound?

    I guess I'm not one to get too caught up in trying to find "that" sound - I have some pretty solid equipment, and I just do what I can to play well so that I sound as much like "me" as possible.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,953
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Nothing can accomplish this.

    All of the Bachs are individual creations that search for the player matched to their characteristics. For many years the instruments looked for players with low third space Cs, high 4th space Ebs and Es and low Gs on top of the staff. Today, Bach has deemed it more fashionable to find players that have a more centered approach.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    HAHA! I love it! So basically what you are saying is that while some people have a romanticized view that old Bachs are better, in truth they aren't as good as current models, right?

    That's one of the reasons I love my Schilke and won't ever go back to playing a Bach - the intonation on my Schilke is astoundingly better than on any Bach I have ever owned. If I decide I want a different sound than a Schilke, I might go to Taylor, Eclipse, Monette, Yamaha, etc, but I don't think I'll ever go back to a Bach.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,953
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    No, I think that many of us need a story that compensates for lack of practice. Every generation of instruments has had a certain amount of "winners". There are some fine older Bachs out there, perhaps a couple with more color/character than even the new models. Many years ago it was not a sin to NOT have 100% consistency. That gave each instrument its own voice. Today, mass manufacturing wants to achieve piece to piece consistency. That has made room for the artisans that are more interested in individuality without comprimise in quality.
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Replace the valve block, leadpipe, slides, valves, and bell with parts from a Mt vernon.

    That's why they are so sought after.
     
  8. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Piano User

    401
    15
    Apr 28, 2006
    Cincinnati, OH
    I think the biggest difference, and the cause for people to clamor for Mt. Vernon Bachs, is that more attention was paid to each horn made. These horns were made by artisans not by assembly line workers. There's probably just a higher percentage of "good ones" from that era. Strads have always been very high quality horns and continue to be so. Some are just better than others, but truly bad ones are rare.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    So what makes them any different or better than say a Taylor, Edwards, Schilke, Monette, or any other hand crafted, artisan made trumpet?
     
  10. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! TRICKG

    My first "professional" horn was a Bach Strad 37 bell. Used it for marching band. Well oddly once it started getting really damp here in Florida during the fall, that it wouldn't perform well anymore. My high c's would come out horribly. The horn wouldn't respond when it was very humid outside. It caused me an embarrassment in front of a packed stadium. i went to play my solo that went up to a high E and it wouldn't play. I was so disappointed. When I got home that night the house humidity level was very very low. I played my solo and the horn played amazing. I went out side my house and played a little bit and then tried my solo again. Guess what, it wouldn't respond.

    Solution to the problem:
    Went and convinced my dad it was time for a new horn. Purchased a Schilke X3. With two weeks worth of heavy duty slurs and long tone exercises I adapted to the huge bore of the X3. Went to districts and played my solo very well with my new Schilke. I love Schilke. I still have my Bach, but I won't be using that outside. I'd like to save myself some embarrassment .
     

Share This Page