Mark Gould on Orchestral Trumpet Playing Over the Years

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Monster Oil, Dec 24, 2015.

  1. Monster Oil

    Monster Oil Piano User

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  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This is one of the most interesting clips in the series. It also matches my experience in Europe. The old school players lived for their orchestra. The newer types of players have solo careers as well. They aren't doing anything "wrong", but htere is much less individual color.
     
  3. LaTrompeta

    LaTrompeta Forte User

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    Could it perhaps be for financial reasons, more than any other? An orchestral career is hardly a secure job these days.
     
  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Herseth, for one, did not particularly like to be the soloist. He much preferred sitting back with the rest of the brass.
    It was easy to identify individual orchestras back then, too. Chicago had its sound, Philly had its sound, NY had its sound, Boston its sound, and Cleveland its sound.
    You would not confuse Herseth with Vacchiano, Johnson with Voisin, or any combination of them you could think of. I'm not slighting Adelstein. He would not be confused with any of the others, either. Cleveland, Philly, and Chicago did, of course, make that never to be topped Gabrielli recording and blended beautifully, but if you listen, you can hear the difference in the groupings.
    Quite frankly, in my opinion it was the golden age of brass playing in orchestras. Especially in the US.
    The players today are great, but as Gould says, there is little difference in sound.
    Rich T.
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    I like his comments on how today the section blends well (better than in yesteryear) and is boring. It is almost too perfect. It looses its excitement. I have gotten to where I prefer live recordings to studio for that reason. There seems to be something real in the recorded live performances as opposed to studio work. Also, he seems to hint at the idea that in the past orchestra players were basically orchestra players and that today's players are far more diverse.
     
  6. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    In my opinion, the Chicago Symphony trumpet section from 1952 to 1965 was the greatest section ever.
    There were only a couple of changes in the section over those years and one was the addition of Frank Kaderabek as assistant principal, who went on to be the principal in Detroit and then Philadelphia.
    Listen to this incredible brass performance on the Polka and Fugue. At 7:25 in, the F# is not held by one superhuman trumpet player, but it is passed off. You almost can't hear the hand-off nor tell any difference in sound, can you?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsStqAiYhDI
    There are some wrong notes and slightly off tuning. The then principal trombone, Robert Lambert, told me years ago Reiner made them do the fugue a couple of times before he was satisfied! This was after recording other things ahead of it. The brass section was tired, period.
    The gist of this is that section when they needed to could blend like no other. From Herseth to Nashan, to Kaderabek (Who I believe is on this recording. If it is not him, it is Bill Babcock) to Chicowicz, it is hard to tell them apart. Great players all!
    Three of them are still alive. Kaderabek, Nashan, and Babcock.
    Rich T.
     
  7. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    On the above recording, it was made January 7, 1956 meaning it is Bill Babcock in the section, not Kaderabek.
    Rich T.
     

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