Martin Imperial Handcraft 1934 Trumpet

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by HollyChris, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. HollyChris

    HollyChris New Friend

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    Aug 28, 2010
    Arlington, TX
    If it is a Cornet and not a trumpet (please be gentle and remember I know nothing about trumpets/cornets) does that mean the serial number dates it differently? Is it still a 1934 or something else? The serial number is up at the top.

    Thanks
     
  2. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    It depends on the company, but usually trumpets and cornets are together. From what I've read of Martin serial numbers, there is nothing to indicate otherwise- it should still be 1934. If tyleman is right and it is Bb, then you should be good to go. I'm sure the band director won't mind. If you are leaning towards having your kid play it, please show him this thread so that he can see how special this horn really is. When he grows up and starts to understand more about the cornet, he'll be really happy that he took care of it.
     
  3. HollyChris

    HollyChris New Friend

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    Aug 28, 2010
    Arlington, TX
    Thank you. We have. He gets real excited about it when we tell him how old it is. His band teacher did say something about a cornet would be fine. But I think I have to get him a new mouthpiece. his paper said a Bach 5B mouthpiece. Currently I have a King 7C. from what my friend told me, the 5B will be easier for him to play than the 7C.

    I guess I'll find out when he takes it to school on Tuesday. LOL

    If he really likes the trumpet, and I can find a good deal on a student model trumpet, I'll get him something else for school. I'm steel having a hard time wrapping my head around our find.

    Not that I plan on getting rid of it, and knowing that you can only see so much from a picture. What would you think the value of my free Cornet is?
     
  4. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    Congrats on your horn-
    I think I speak on behalf on everyone on this site when I say that it is VERY ironic that you would keep this obscure cornet and change your mouthpiece. That is probably the last thing I would have expected, because the 7C is THE mouthpiece that pretty much all beginners start on. It doesn't mean that other mouthpieces don't work, but it's just that, because of it's medium size, it's the standard for beginners mouthpieces. However, it seems that your director has been pretty flexible already and it wouldn't hurt to get a 5B. There is only one problem though- from what I understand, cornets before the 1950s had different specs for where the shank (that is the "bottom" end of the mouthpiece) meets the mouthpiece receiver. This means that modern cornet mpcs won't fit properly on the cornet. Maybe if you could explain this to your director, he'd be willing to let your son start on the 7C.

    As for the value of the horn, I'd say that the playing value of your horn far outweighs the market value as the Imperial Handcraft is always outshined by it's successor, the Martin Committee, which was played by too many famous players to count. However, it's starting catch on- I'd put it at 500-800 based on what I've seen, though I may be wrong.
     
  5. HollyChris

    HollyChris New Friend

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    Aug 28, 2010
    Arlington, TX
    LOL - I can understand that. Like I've said several times. I know nothing about cornets other than what little I've learned from this website. I will wait to see what she says on Tuesday after Lewis takes it to school.

    Thank you again to everyone who has helped me understand what we have. I'll let you know what she says after she sees it.
     
  6. tyleman

    tyleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 20, 2009
    Monpazier, France
    Hi Holly,
    I should have mentioned earlier - one of the things about older horns is because they have sat unplayed for a long time, they need to be "tuned up" by a repair person. I would heartily recommend finding someone who could clean the horn, grease the slides, oil the valves and make sure the compression is good enough with the valves that the horn is playable. You mentioned your husband played trumpet at one time, and it's certainly possible he would know the procedure. Also, the brace needs to be resoldered - by a professional (as they use a special type of solder).

    My first horn was a cornet and I have played cornet for 35 years, rarely playing the "brother" instrument, the trumpet. I took a lot of flack for playing the cornet when i was a kid, but I stuck by my guns because I preferred the sound and the look. There's something distinctive about the cornet.

    Let us know here on the TM if we can be of any help to you or your son in the future.

    Cheers,
    Chris
     
  7. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    Your Martin ' extended cornet' was one of many of that era that were made to be more conical in bore than trumpets. Just off of the top of my head I remember and own a Holton, a King, a couple of Yorks, and a Martin just like the one in your photo. My Martin play wonderfully and has a very sweet tone that can be pushed to great brightness when that is needed. This model is a fine horn that was made before Martin started to make 'student grade' horns. It is a certified artist grade instrument. Its physical condition because of its age concerns me somewhat and demands that it be "tuned up" by an expert technician before the boy gets stuck with an old clunker instead of a professional grade horn that it was manufactured to be.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  8. HollyChris

    HollyChris New Friend

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    Aug 28, 2010
    Arlington, TX
    Thank you I will be sure to get it tuned up for him.
     
  9. ogauge47

    ogauge47 Piano User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    Metro Detroit, Michigan
    I would look around for an Olds Ambassador for him to play on for a while. That Martin in beautiful and they are not that easy to find in that condition.
     
  10. joe1joey

    joe1joey Piano User

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    Jul 3, 2010
    E.Panhandle WV
    Hello. First of all, a cornet is a wonderful instrument for many reasons that need not be illustrated for the purpose of my '2 cents' at this moment. I do want to point out that its size and wrap (shape) makes it a bit easier for a young person to physically play/practise for reasonable periods of time...more so than the trumpet. For the sake of learning the basics, there is no difference what so ever in the two. Fortunately, if you wish to purchase a trumpet because peer pressure has affected the situation, there are a few very good beginner horns available that can be had for far less than their 'real' value. The Holton T602, (or better yet 602 R or 602 RC) are horns that were wildly popular for rentals, were made for many years and sell for less than 100 even 75 in excellent shape on eBay. Ask questions about the 'finish' on the horn as it is hit and miss. Another truly excellent trumpet is the Conn Director of the fifties and early sixties...no later. Finally, and not because there arent many other good horns, but because these are plentiful, is the Olds Ambassador. Arguably the best of this set, but prices are creeping up and condition of the horn will not be the same as the other two at the same price point. However, the real 'steal', nobly suggested a bit earlier in this thread is the Ambassador Cornet. WAAAAY underpriced, it is easy to find truly fine examples for less than $75 sometimes as little as $50. With the Olds, keep your vintage before the '70's as the chances for a better built model decrease in the years from the late 40's/early fifties to the late 60's. Just remember, even the wisest of kids love a shiny horn...a few extra dollars to find the cream of the group is definitely worth it. Hope you don't need any of this advice,and the best to you and your son's venture into making music. :play:
    BTW... I do agree with keeping the Martin 'on the side' until later.
     

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