Maynard at his best.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by rbdeli, May 12, 2009.

  1. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    I have heard many young trumpet players tell me they started listening to Maynard in the 80's, and they have never heard anything he played prior to 1977. This is too bad. By 1980, Maynard was only 20% the trumpet player he used to be, in my opinion.

    His very best playing days were between 1958 - 1971. Though, he had incredible chops from 1948-1955, his solos didn't quite have the musicality and creativety he played with later on.

    By far, his best jazz solos are 1958-1961. Some of my very favorite solos: Foxy, Ole, Ol' Man River, Slide's Derrangement, And We Listened. The Way You Look Tonight from 1955 is awesome. He had it all: Tone, incredible technique, range, imagination and musicality.

    Too bad, but many people judge Maynard as a player based on the way he played in the last 3 decades of his career. He was out of his prime by about 1977.
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    I've listened to Maynard from the late 50s until his death.

    I don't think he was any stronger in those years.

    He just played different styles.

    Maynard in the 70s, 80s and 90s was just as strong as he was in the 60s.

    Of course, these are both just our opinions.
     
  3. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    There is simply no comparison to his physical playing in those days to what it was in the 80's and 90s.

    I'm not referring to his style, just his playing mechanics.
    Listen to his lower register. His control. His tone. He clearly lost his chops in the 80's. His sound became nasaly and he quit playing the entire phrase of passages, cut-off notes short, skipped the technical part of cadenzas and squeeked out the double-c at the end.

    I've been fortunate enough to catch Maynard live in the 80's on a rare night when his chops were feeling good and you could hear some of the magic from his old days.

    I've never heard another player touch the way he played in those days. But I've heard lots of guys squeek out high notes just as good as the way he did in his latter days.
     
  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Napalm, anyone?
     
  5. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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    I think I may have some around! Maynard was always the "Boss" no matter what the era, as far as I am concerned. His influence went well beyond his incredible playing.:thumbsup:
     
  6. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    That's something we can agree on, for sure!
    What an influence he was in modern music for all trumpet players, even those who don't realize it!



     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think your recollection of his playing is not consistent. There were no squeeks right up to the end of his life. He never "lost his chops".

    This type of post comes up from time to time by the self proclaimed jazz experts that don't appreciate his more "commercial" work. That is their loss.

    Maynard was the BOSS, a title he earned because unlike many of his colleagues, he was able to keep a band going his whole life. He took in so many "kids" and they turned into MONSTERS through his inspiration. He gave them an opportunity to play in a way no other could.

    It is always possible to put blinders on. For the most part, that just means lost joy. Your opinion is yours. I do not share it. I witnessed the BOSS in many stages of his life. I ALWAYS walked away excited, inspired, motivated.

    Nobody is above criticism, but you should do some more homework before posting senselessness.

    Sorry for the flame, I just hate blind by choice.
     
  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    If I may add something extra, I saw Maynard live outdoors in 2003. He had a great section with Pat Hession on lead, who is an incredible lead trumpet player with astonishing power.
    When Maynard came in on the first tune, he literally blew the entire band away with an incredible double C. His sound was HUGE and the audience went nuts. His sound was great all night and he still was the BOSS.
    There will never be another Maynard. There will always be great high note players but the power he had up there is the stuff of legend and he was an extraordinary once-in-a-century talent.
    Rich Tomasek
     
  9. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    I agree with this. Maynard was/is the standard-bearer. Hessions, Bergeron, Miyashiro, etc. all ALL fantastic lead players, but they're not Maynard...and I bet they would say the same.

    That said, to a degree I understand what the original poster is referring to. On the old TrumpetStuff site they had a clip of Maynard playing "Blow Gabriel Blow" sometime in the 50's (I think Ethel Merman(?) was singing) and it was incredible!! Maynard sounded like a friggin laser in the clip all the way up to and above double C. It was much different than the last time I heard Maynard in the early 2000's.

    I think the difference is a combination of a young Maynards chops and the differences in audio equipment available at the time.
     
  10. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    "Self proclaimed Jazz Expert?".. That's not me. I'm far from that. I loved some of Maynard's Commercial music. I'm simply referring to his physical playing ability. He wasn't a fraction of the trumpet player he used to be in his latter days. His tone, sound and flexibility were gone 20 years before he passed away. He couldn't sustain passages with control, balance, dynamics and beauty like he did from 1950 -1977 or so.. Yeah, he could still peel the paint from the walls with a double-c, but he didn't have 1/10th the sound, control and overall ability he used to have.

    Let me ask you this, if you wanted to show a young kid what a great trumpet player sounded like, would you use any of his 1990's music as a model? I am the biggest Maynard fan in the world, but be honest his tone was horrible in the 90's and beyond.

    And don't forget, he still played a lot of traditional jazz tracks even up until his last album. If he still had the chops he did in 1961, why didn't he use them on jazz solos?






     

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