Maynard Ferguson Range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpettrax, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2011
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    I’ve never heard the term “static” used in terms of notes, music. If they were exciting as you say they were, then they had value, if they had value in the piece then they are real notes. You can easily hear them on the recording, so they have frequency, you can even place them in the staff if needed. If you like calling them “Non-Notes” that’s fine, that’s not my opinion of them. They are quieter than his normal full sound, but thinking about what you have to do with your “Set” to get those out, mechanically they would be quieter, they are extreme. Just my opinion here. So I’m not really sure what your getting at. If your comparing two incredible players, fine, but that is something I don’t do personally. Maynard has been my mentor as long as I can remember and still is. Bud is also a mentor of mine as well as a few others. To me, they are as real as any other note. I also agree with Janet Lee, Maynard was like everyone else, he had good days and bad days. The bad days he bit into the mic a little harder, the good days he probably didn’t need a mic. He said once that on his good days, you could drive a Mac-Truck through his aperture it was so open.
     
  2. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    "Statics" or "Cyclonics" were terms used by Roy Stevens in his book: "Embouchure self analysis ; and, The Stevens-Costello triple C embouchure technique"

    Every beginner or anyone who studied with Stevens was instructed to learn to play these wispy extremely high notes right off the bat. Yeah it was a very radical text. I own a copy of it and the method doesn't exactly fit me very well. nor a lot of trumpet players. but for those who could use it? Worked miracles.

    The beginner learned to play notes in the vicinity of High G to Double C nearly on day one. They differ in tone quality from regular "notes" because they have less strength and only soft volume. Kind of like those triple C notes Maynard played on the Mike Douglas show.

    http://www.roystevens.org/html/writings.html/
     
  3. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Jul 1, 2011

    "Statics" or "Cyclonics" were terms used by Roy Stevens in his book: "Embouchure self analysis ; and, The Stevens-Costello triple C embouchure technique"

    Every beginner or anyone who studied with Stevens was instructed to learn to play these wispy extremely high notes right off the bat. Yeah it was a very radical text. I own a copy of it and the method doesn't exactly fit me very well. nor a lot of trumpet players. but for those who could use it? Worked miracles.

    The beginner learned to play notes in the vicinity of High G to Double C nearly on day one. They differ in tone quality from regular "notes" because they have less strength and only soft volume. Kind of like those triple C notes Maynard played on the Mike Douglas show.

    The Stevens book and other info can be found here:

    www.roystevens.org | Tribute Site
     
  4. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    Jul 19, 2010
    That seems to imply there's no strength or physicality in playing high notes. And THAT seems to imply 99% of everything I've read on TM about high notes is wrong. It also seems to imply that Arturo, Maynard, and other high noters are just faking it when they look like their faces are about to burst playing those extreme high notes.
     
  5. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Not at all. Much of the Stevens book is devoted to identifying and strengthening the muscles used to play the trumpet.

    Playing a solid High G and above at good volume will always require a fair amount of physical exertion. Both in wind and facial muscle usage. The fact still remains that in a person fortunate to not have a cut off point in his chops (dictated by whether or not he takes advantage of physical law either by intentional design or naturally such as Maynard and others) can at least sustain a Double C at soft volume without much effort.

    When playing the Stevens System (or one of its hybrids) it is even possible to circular breath while holding a Double C. Done it myself although the tone tends to break or oscillate a bit more than for the lower octave.

    So for those who have natural chops or are lucky enough to convert to Stevens (or similarly capable chops systems) it really isn't all that big of a deal to blow the Double C.

    Some of those forward jaw cats use less energy to blow a DHC than most others do while playing a mere g top of the staff.

    I'm told that when Steve Reid switches to his other embouchure and wigs out his chops he can't play any musical sounding note BELOW A HIGH F!

    here he is blowing a bunch of statics. (finally I find an example!)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5h7E5xyMxw

    He blows better usually than this demonstration..
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  6. Janet Lee

    Janet Lee New Friend

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    May 1, 2011

    You are confusing two things.

    It takes proper embouchure technique, not great embouchure strength, to play high notes very softly.

    Then it takes extremely strong embouchure to maintain that same lip formation when playing extremely loudly.

    The strain you see on Maynard's face is from his playing those high notes extremely loudly.
    When Maynard played those same high notes very softly, there was no or little strain in his face.
    Same with Bill Chase and others.

    A beginning trumpet player can have proper embouchure technique, either by luck or through teacher, and play soft high notes.
    But it takes a lot of practice over many months or many years to develop embouchure strength for playing those same high notes very loudly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    +1
    no -- I think that is what it looks like --- at least for me --- not really that easy to get decent high notes (around high G and high A) -- unless I exert some force and some energy ---- can't seem to make it "look" easy ---- and it doesn't feel "easy" either ---- but it is still way cool to get a small 7 or 8 bar riff in that range that sounds decent!!!!!!!!! ---
     
  8. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    Jul 19, 2010
    I'll have to try this out my next practice session. Something still sounds counterintuitive, but I'm certainly not qualified to judge one way or the other. Seems like, if this was a weightlifting forum, you'd be saying with the correct technique a new weightlifter can clean and jerk twice his weight but hold it only for a half second IF he holds the bar with a loose grip. But it takes years of practice to actually keep the weight up for a long time with a tight grip. On the other hand, if this works maybe I can live my dream, if only very softly, to "play like Maynard"! (...not)
     
  9. Janet Lee

    Janet Lee New Friend

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    May 1, 2011
    Only take a normal breath, not a deep breath, because you won't be using much air.

    Embouchure should be firm but not overly tense, and rest of the body semi-relaxed, too.

    Only use very mild mouthpiece pressure, not mashing your lips.

    Do very soft slurs and scales upward.

    You are not lifting 1,000 pounds, you are making soft sqeals into the upper register.

    [All of this assumes that you are using a correct embouchure in the first place.]

    You will probably reach a point where you find it difficult or impossible to play a note.
    Just jump over that note and softly squeal above it.
    With some mouthpieces I find it difficult to play a High C, but I just jump over it to play on up to a Double C.

    My main instrument is French Horn, but I play trumpet, too, using exactly the same embouchure and exactly the same techniques.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  10. Marston

    Marston New Friend

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    Mar 3, 2012
    When we need him (Rowuk) where is he? ;)
     

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