Measuring Lung Capacity (Easy Kitchen Method)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Close. It's a 'spirometer'.

    This is exactly the point I was making in the first paragraph of my OP. None of us on this forum know what your mf and pp are so we have no real reference frame on which to base an answer. Now if you'd graphed out your apparent air flow (lung volume divided by note duration) against lung pressure through your comfortable pitch and dynamic ranges, we could start to gauge whether there's likely to be a lot of air mixed in with the buzz in some areas, or if you seem to be using excessive pressure to reach some notes, or if you haven't yet developed the skills to play a true pianissimo. If you have a good teacher, he would be able to determine this just by observing you while playing. We don't have that luxury, so we need good solid data if you are truly interested in an accurate comparison with the better players (not me yet, alas).

    One thing I have found is that if I'm sitting or standing in a comfortable position when I take my readings, I get figures that seem to line up fairly sensibly. But some readings have to be taken in a somewhat crouched position due to how my equipment is set up. This can easily wipe 20 seconds of my note duration. Tells me two things:

    1) I need to recruit Mrs Seth's help to take the readings so I just concentrate on playing a relaxed steady note.
    2) If there is any unnecessary tension in my body when I'm playing, it robs me of as much as half the air that I should be putting through the instrument. That is a BIG result.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Those of you who subscribe to the ITG Journal might be interested in the article starting page 44:

    ....and an interesting article a little further on (page 51):

    ....is well worth a read through.

    Got me thinking about this stuff again and trying out a couple of useful sounding exercises I'd not come across before.
     
  3. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    Interdasting about Valsalva. We weightlifters use it a lot. The only problem (for me, that is) is having my body know when to let air out. Powerlifters don't exhale during a lift, so i'm very used to having a closed throat, which becomes a problem when playing trumpet because my throat wants to close involuntarily.
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Took me a little while to convince myself that this wasn't an issue for me. These unconscious habits can be really difficult to identify and correct.

    I remember my teacher telling me not to 'squeeze' the high notes when I was 9 or 10, and not really understanding what he meant at the time. But he was insistent on me keeping the airways open. I guess it must have been this Valsalva response he was referring to, and I guess his message must have sunk in somehow.
     
  5. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    I don't know if it's as prevalent in western europe as in United States, but a lot of people have dysfunctional breathing, i.e., they breathe only with their upper chest and not with their diaphragms.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Probably something to do with not having to chase after our dinners with a pointy stick anymore.
     

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