Messed up my chops

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by joejarrett, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. joejarrett

    joejarrett New Friend

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    Apr 3, 2011
    A few years ago after not playing for a long period of time I practiced on my trumpet several days to play gig. That nite playing in a club that was quite noisy & having to play loud, I experienced the following; In the middle of a ride, the fine tone that I had suddenly sounded like one of my valves had turned in my horn or sounded like a "sick cat". I managed to finish the gig but the few times I tried to play after that was the same thing so I quit playing. Three months ago I decided to try to build up my chops by practicing an hour or so each day thinking that whatever I had done to my chops had healed but I still have the "sick cat" tone. I'm thinking that I have ruptured my chops or something of that nature. Has anyone experienced something like this or know of someone & what exactly did I do to my chops????
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    You over did it and it sounds like you have developed a "split-tone". Thats not good if you aren't trying to do it. Try playing softly and start back SLOWLY!! If you have not played in quite a while, you'll just hurt yourself overdoing it. Kinda like sprinting 100 yards without a warmup, you will hurt something. Slow and soft to start with as much rest as playing time.:thumbsup:
     
  3. joejarrett

    joejarrett New Friend

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    Apr 3, 2011
    Thanks for your reply!!!!! Will sure try doing this!
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    YES, what he said. You did major muscle stain that impacted on how the muscle fibers coordinate contractions. End result, split-tone. Let relaxation and time heal. If this alone does not work, rehab would be the next course to consider. AND if that doesn't work, there's also the organ, for which I recommend the Hammond B3.
     
  5. new02

    new02 New Friend

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    and just to be certain, make sure there are no leaks in the horn!

    Speaking of the hammond B3, theres a music professor on youtube who tells a very funny story about moving on to the hammond organ because he thought he had lost his chops!

    YouTube - Kevin Dean - The Hammond Organ
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2011
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I don't think you "ruptured your chops" or had a "major muscle strain" (which technically are the same thing). I think it's simpler than this.

    You played a hard gig after not playing for a while, and your chops gave out in the middle of the gig. Then, after not playing for an extended period, you started practicing an hour a day, and developed problems.

    In both cased, as tobylou8 suggested, it sounds like you simply over-did it. And building on what tobylou8 suggested, you need to start your comeback more gradually, like 15 minutes a day, and slowly building up from there.

    EDiT: Great post new02. I'm going to check my leadpipe today. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2011
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    What a cool story! Wish he also recorded his Hammond Organ playing as well. I can tell you, I most love playing my trumpet, but as far as the most perfect instrument EVER made... Nothing can compare to a Hammond B3 with a Leslie speaker.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    No I think it's strain. Rupture and strain are not the same thing. There is first strain, then sprain (or muscle tear). Sprain is seen in 3 stages, 1st degree (just a minor tear), 2nd degree (Substancial tear into the belly of the muscle, and 3rd degree (a Complete tear or rupture).

    Read the following link to learn more, and the worst case possibility of the 3rd degree tear (Satchmo's Syndrome).

    Medscape: Medscape Access
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Hi Gary.

    One of the limitations of posting online is that we don't always know the background of the other participants. I understand that you are an academic physician, which is great. I am also a practicing physician and a professor of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine at an academic institution. I am also familiar with the literature in Performing Arts Medicine, including the "Maladies in Musicians" article you referenced.

    Strains and sprains, as you know, represent a continuum of injuries to the muscle structure, which both involve tears. The difference is the degree of the tear and which structures are injured. In addition, any muscle "tear" can also be referred to as a "rupture". The term "major muscle strain", even though it's somewhat colloquial, would logically be interpreted as a "major tear". I am not saying that you are incorrect. And I will concede that the informality of these terms can lead to disagreements of their exact meaning among physicians.

    The reason for my original reply (that they are essentially the same) is that I feared the OP was being confused by too much medical jargon. I felt the OP needed simplification of these terms and reassurance that any physical damage was unlikely.

    Back to the OP's question -- without related signs (swelling, pain, etc.), a tear of any kind (strain, sprain, rupture) is highly unlikely.

    Mike
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    TrumpetTM - Agreed. The information given by joejarrett may not have been involving pain or swelling which can be signs of strain (tears). If any readers want to see if they have experienced stain or tear, I refer you to the following link on background information concerning this thread. There is also good advice at the end of this section as to measures to take should a strain or tear is experienced.

    I agree, with TrumpetMD, and For TM readers that would like to learn more on muscle strain.

    By the way, if JoeJarrett is reading these posts, let us know how you are progressing at getting back to your playing. As you can see from these recent posts, the doctors are in, and want to help in anyway we can. Thanks again TrumpetMD.
     

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