Methods for a young beginner

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by christineka, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

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    Even though it may be boring, the kid will thank you in the future for making them start with the most basic stuff. Rubank's will do that, and so will Arban's. Also, Bill Pfund's beginning method for trumpet is absolutely excellent. I give any of those a 10/10 ranking.
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Hi there

    Another one of my daft ideas, have a quick look at some of UK based music shop websites. Over here we tend to be obsessed with making things fun for children (almost and sometimes past the point of condecension and to the point that it puts some kids off because they feel they are being babyed) You might just get a different view

    Cheers

    Andrew
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    That is why you have way more cornet players than trumpeters! Trumpet playing is serious stuff, and only becomes real fun after the player becomes serious! :cool:
     
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Honestly VB I have known kids put off music by the worst of the music books over here. Anecdodtally I did two years Teacher Training (before I saw the error of my ways). We had a lecturer teaching us how to run a class for to junior (9-11 year olds) she insisted on teaching them "5 Little Speckled Frogs) I disagreed and In a clas I was taking I used "Everyday" telling the children about the rythm being played on the knees on the record. I got the better response from the kids. to be fair my lecturer conceded the point.

    Cheers Andrew
     
  5. christineka

    christineka Pianissimo User

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    The first piano lesson went well. We went on to unit two. The boy initially grumbled, but got into it and stayed on task for 30 minutes. Later when he complained he was bored and wanted something to do I suggested he practice piano. To my surprise he went to it, practiced everything he was supposed to, then flipped the page and figured out the next few exercises!

    Before beginning lessons I showed him two methods that are basically the same only one written with a 6 year old in mind (lots of color) and the other for an older child (no color). He chose the younger book with color.

    A few weeks ago I was trying to figure out what kind of math curriculum to buy for my children (planning to homeschool) and was trying to decide whether colorful pictures were important. My 10 year old told me that colored pages didn't matter because she could color them herself. So, If a music book is too boring due to color, I could just let the child color himself. I'm more concerned with the music. My dh teaches clarinet. He loves the Rubank books, but he says the younger kids are just bored to death with them, so he went out and found a book with familiar melodies in it. Apparently playing long tones for pages isn't very inspiring.

    Now, about Pfund's beginning method is it really good for a kid? It looks like it is out of print, so I'd buy a used copy, but not be able to see inside. I was also looking at the Edwards-Hovey method. I played out of the Potag-Hovey Horn method and enjoyed the exercises. I wish there was a store near me with lots of trumpet methods to browse or that scopes and sequences or reviews were on the internet. It's sure hard to choose.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I can understand where you are coming from, and not knowing the books in question, cannot confirm how awful they are, but would like to bring up the idea of fun vs. pleasure.

    Fun, for me, is cheap instant gratification kind of stuff; pleasure is rich stuff that can last a lifetime. Fun is instant gratification with a sharp decay time, while pleasure blooms. Granted, students need positive feedback, which a teacher (or parents or groupies) can provide, but if they never discover the pleasure in mastering (and maybe just for the moment) something special, something that makes them truly elite, art is not furthered, and any praise we give is in reality just hype.

    A great trumpet method is progressive in terms of the rate at which difficulties are presented, but is useless as part of a "check the box" approach to pedagogy.

    I strongly object to what may be called "an objective" approach to art-- "right rhythm and right notes = perfect" was found in abundance when I was teaching in Germany, while insightful performances with chipped notes were held in lower regard.

    Arrgh!

    Real musicians make mistakes, and those at the absolute top of our craft make great music without making mistakes. Not making mistakes, however, does not make one a musician, let alone a great one.

    Boethius classified music as "mathematics with morals." For me, morals are more important than mathematics (and ethics more important than both).

    Trying to sell a student looking through a microscope for hours at end as something "fun" is something ludicrous. Teaching it as a window into the unknown, into something wonderful, is not.

    That is why I strongly believe my calling as a player/teacher/moderator isn't about fun--it is about something wonderful, something that I am a disciple of.

    Trumpet methods can't make disciples. Only trumpet (and with all due respect, cornet) players can.

    Thanks for encouraging me put into words some stuff deep inside!
     
  7. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

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    Yes, the Pfund method is quite good. I own one myself. He is a great teacher based out of Colorado, and focuses on fundamentals with kids. These exercises are simple, but are also great fun. See, he's the kind of guy that does it all because he loves how much fun it is (hence "fun" being in his name ;) )
     
  8. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Hi VB

    Nicely put, we might be a little of topic with the thread but I like your views.

    I think it is the "babying" of young people and children I object to. I was subject to the "Children don't like Classical Music" movement over here and forced to play pseudo rags, pseudo jazz and swung childrens tunes. By that time I had a record collection conssting of Mozart, Purcell, Haydn and a lot of all the Strausses.

    Obviously individuality must be taken into account but surely the way to go is to expose a student to a wide range of music for them to find their own way (with proper guidance of course)

    Cheers

    Andrew
     
  9. christineka

    christineka Pianissimo User

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    My children have learned to appreciate classical music. We listen to it while driving. Some years ago I switched from the fun children's cds to Handel's Messiah. The kids originally complained, but by the second time through they had adapted to listening to different music. We do have cds that the children enjoy such as Disney, and Cats, but most of the time we listen to the classical radio station. The children are excited when they are old enough to go to concerts. I probably don't expose my children to enough "other" types of music.

    I just know that pages of long tones, scales, and arpeggios aren't the most interesting. I also think a young beginner needs the staves and notes a little larger to have an easier time with the transition to reading music. (Just as new readers need larger print.)
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Hi christineka,
    Do you play trumpet? ven if you don't here's my recipe that I use on my daughter:
    I started my daughter at around age 2.
    1) Without a trumpet, I taught her how to lip buzz by lip buzzing with her for a couple of months
    2) Without a trumpet, I gave her a mouthpiece and we would do "Bee" sounds and siren sounds with the mouthpiece for around a month
    3)we put the mouthpiece in the trumpet and played together with her watching what valves I pushed and copying that I do. What did I have her copy? Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, the C scale and lip slurs (C G C), (D G D), (Bb F Bb)
    4) She is required to play a little every day, either early in the morning before school or prompty after school. A set would go like this:
    Do a little lip buzzing(less than a minute), then buzz the mouthpiece a little (<minute) then long tones with lip slurs for about a minute. Then play some songs. All in all about 20 minutes to 1/2 hour.

    I constantly watch out for her playing too loud(always focus on playing soft but not airy) and using too much pressure which will often result in a blatty ragged notes.
    We use Easy Steps to the Band (the same book I used 300 years ago when I was a kid) and I write out little gingles in the key of C from popular songs for her to play when she requests it.
    Good Luck!!
     

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