Mistake: Vaseline on slides

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Cpt.Funk, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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    I have used Bag Balm, a mixture of vaseline and lanoline for years with no problem. Add to the effectiveness by also dropping a bit of valve oil on the slide also.
     
  2. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    Mr. Moderator, "you mean that the trumpet players drink the beer?" Sh*t! I've been feeding it into my horns all this time. No wonder why they slur the notes in appropriately, and burp from both ends.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Gary
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    petroleum jelly (vaseline) --- I am still using the same jar that I had when I was in school (circa 1975) -- I've always used it on my slides ---- and have my original trumpet when I was in 5th grade (so it has only been 37 years of so) -- NEVER had red rot. This is good news, because after all these years, I still have a HALF A JAR of petroleum jelly left --- I'm hoping that lasts the next 37 years, at which time, I won't be needing it anymore!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Stewmac,

    We knew you could cut through any orchestra with your horn -now we know why. Chainsaw oil. :)

    To the original poster:

    First, vasoline does NOT cause red rot. If anything, it prevents it. Red rot is most common in the first half of leadpipe. Ever known anyone to coat the inside of their leadpipe with vasline? Not me. Where to they put the vasoline? On the slides. What parts of the horn almost never have redrot? The slides. In reality, I am still open to what really causes red rot (but I am sure it isn't vasoline). I have heard a number of very knowledgeable people post on causes, but they do not all agree on the cause.

    Like others, I have used vasoline for 50 years. Not a sign of red rot. The only issue with vasoline is that if you put up a horn for 30 years, the vasoline can dry out and almost act like a cement with slides. Yes, you can still get them loose, but it is a job. That said, I wouldn't be the least concerned going 2-3 years with vasoline in storage. Just not decades.

    Finally, while we are on the vasoline topic, a thought came to mind last time I was cleaning and greasing a horn with vasoline. Many of you are probably aware of those who make a big deal about any minor blemish or flaw-like a sorder blob-remining in the horn and affecting sound. There are even folks who send there horns off to have them teated for this. As I was applying vasoline, I noticed that occasionally a small blob forms at the end of the inner tube as you work the slide after applying vasoline. Wouldn't this small blob affect sound just as much as an unsmooth sorder joint? Just wondering what others think on this.
     
  5. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    I think it is universally accepted that red rot is the selective leaching of zinc from the brass, as zinc is more reactive than copper, a weak acid will dissolve it in preference to copper. The air we exhale is saturated with water vapor at body temperature and condenses out in the horn at a lower temperature, also contains approx 5% carbon dioxide some of which will be dissolved in the condensate to form carbonic acid. This is how I see it.

    A blob of grease on the end of the slide may make a difference if large enough, unless the slides are very loose not much grease is needed, I find an amount about half a match head is more than enough for both legs of the tuning slide.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  6. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    [/QUOTE] As I was applying vasoline, I noticed that occasionally a small blob forms at the end of the inner tube as you work the slide after applying vasoline. Wouldn't this small blob affect sound just as much as an unsmooth sorder joint? Just wondering what others think on this.[/QUOTE]

    Why not just remove the blobs with a cotton swab?
     
  7. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I've never heard that Vaselene causes red rot, and I would seriously doubt it, unless a horn with it on the slides is neglected to the point of the crud mixing with Vaselene and causing red rot. Still, though, the Vaslene wouldn't be the cause of the red rot.
     
  8. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    As I was applying vasoline, I noticed that occasionally a small blob forms at the end of the inner tube as you work the slide after applying vasoline. Wouldn't this small blob affect sound just as much as an unsmooth sorder joint? Just wondering what others think on this.[/QUOTE]

    Why not just remove the blobs with a cotton swab?[/QUOTE]
    Yes, that would be the smart thing to do. I was just thinking that many folks put vasoline on the slide, push it in, and never check to see what has developed at the end of the tubing. I.e., it may form without anyone ever noticing it.
     
  9. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I have heard that vaseline can slow down mobile slides (1st and 3rd) but I even take that wih a pinch of salt.
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Andrew,

    Actually you are correct. Add a few drops of valve oil with it and speed improves.
     

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