Mistake: Vaseline on slides

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Cpt.Funk, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO, your theory doesn't have merit. We want fast valve slides, the minute space as may be sealed with the proper lubricant. Think a trombone slide and everyone I've known would slide off if it were not secured. The tech remedy for a trumpet valve slide would be to install a threaded stop mechanism.
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Consider the uses for oil/grese - cleaning, cooling, lubricating, and sealing. Lubrication can't work unless there is a gap between the surfaces, particularly in a non pressurised system.
     
  3. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Two good points. The threaded stop is a good suggestion. As for the slide, a trombone slide has more surface area than a trumpet third valve slide and can tolerate the increased area of a thinner lubricant. Which raises the question: "What about the valves?" Simple answer: They all leak; it's a matter of degree. When they leak more than they should, playing is affected. I would think that a slide loose enough to fall out could mimic a worn valve in effect.
     
  4. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Ah, yes! The possibilities are endless!!:roll:

    A quick tutorial on basic rules: to lube or not to lube:
    If it moves, grease it.
    if it doesn't move, paint it.
    If it moves and it shouldn't move, duct tape it
    If it doesn't move and should, lube it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I agree 100%. The 3rd and 1st slides on most of my horns are lightning fast. That is the way they should be if you plan on using them. If not, let them freeze in place. :D My Getzens have those cute,lovely plastic/delrin adjustable slide stops for 3rd slide. Without them, the slides would fall out whenever 3rd valve is depressed and the horn angle is down (been there/done that, fortunately no dents).
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Excluding a horn sustaining trauma, insufficient lubrication and/or improper finger manipulation of the valves over time may cause a valve to leak, but you'd have to actually test over 10,000 trumpets to prove all the valves leak to some degree, and I know of no recognized technical test that does that. Mishandling in resetting a valve and ignoring proper maintenance on the valve corks and felts are the major cause of notes not accurately responding to what the player or manufacturer intended.

    Further, remove the stops and I'd venture the majority of all manipulated slides, 1st & 3rd valve and trombone slides would freely separate from the instrument if maintained properly.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012
  7. bachfella

    bachfella Mezzo Piano User

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    I actually had no problems using Vaseline on my tuning slides for decades, but I cleaned my horn on a monthly basis, and didn't use a ton of Vaseline--just a thin coat, followed by a spray of water. I'm now using tuning slide grease on my tech's advice, but Vaseline has served my slides well, and I wouldn't rule out using it again. The horn right now is a month or two overdue for a bath (I've been busy). Gotta get to it TONIGHT!!
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    68th post and I'm thinking all these players use vaseline for DECADES w/o RR issues. Cpt. Funk is nowhere to be found and only said he "read" it somewhere. Where-O-Where did you read this Cpt.??!! Only thing I can think is an anecdotal example where a player eats Doritos and drinks coke as he plays (during the rests of course). Player uses vaseline on his slides and oil on his valves but never washes his horn (let alone swabbing the leadpipe). Horn gets RR! Must have been the vaseline. ROFL
     
  9. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    A long time ago one of my teachers showed me a good way to check the valves on a trumpet. I don't know if you could call it a recognized technical test, but it is practical, IMO: Firmly seal the bell with a handball, blow in the receiver, and listen for leaks. Try it, you might be surprised. If you want to check for slide leaks only, take the valves and bottom caps out, and plug the openings with rubber corks (an oxymoron if I ever heard one), available at hardware stores. Just be sure to secure the slides so they don't pop out. If you wanted to just check the valves, remove the slides, and plug the slide tubes instead. If someone wanted to get really technical, they could hook up a known pressure source, take a reading with it connected to the plugged horn, and calculate the percentage difference. This figure could be used to compare the leakage on different horns.
     
  10. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    There is such a device available, cost around $400, contains a pressure source and a flowmeter with arbitary calibration 0 to 5, I believe Osmun has a similar test.

    Regards, Stuart.
     

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