Monette question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. John FOWLER

    John FOWLER New Friend

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    Jan 22, 2007
    Yeah - I'm, sort of, oriented to finding information on the net rather than telephoning them from Australia.

    The prices SURELY must be somewhere, but certainly not on the expected source - David G. Monette Corporation.

    I suppose that if you want to buy a Monette you aren't particularly worried about the price, eh? (Like bargaining over the price of a new Rolls Royce! If you think about prices you simply can't afford one.)
     
  2. michael shanks

    michael shanks New Friend

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    Jan 12, 2007
    Do you think I should get a monette mouthpiece I really like the info Ive been reading on them. I think it would be well wirth taking the risk to try one out do you all. I was just wondering what you results have been like on a monette B2 mouthpiece
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Michael,
    I have been playing the B2 since 1997. I have the original non-Prana B2, a B2D (deep), a Prana B2 and a Prana B2D.
    I used to play a Bach 1C. 2 weeks before my final college recital, I switched to a Schilke 18. I played that mouthpiece for 10 years and then switched to the Monette. I will avoid all of the stuff that sounds like an ad. This mouthpiece is substantially different from any "conventional" piece that I have played however.
    If I play it the exact same way as the Schilke or Bach, the upper octave is sharp and the lower octave is flat. When playing the Schilke and Bach I had a natural "pivot" that means the higher that I played, the more I would angle the trumpet down. After the switch, I did not pivot, I learned a lot about relaxing when I play and at no time did I think about going back.
    I have a large collection of instruments and no desire to look for any other solution. My sound has more "core" and projection than I had before. I find the rim shape very comfortable. I try other mouthpieces from time to time (also other Monettes). On the non-Monette pieces the octaves do not line up, the high range is flat and low sharp - back comes the need for a pivot. The bigger Monette mouthpieces sound bigger, but I am not willing to commit to the additional practice time necessary to do them justice. The smaller mouthpieces, well, sound smaller and that is not what I want.
    The benefits as I see them:
    1) more resonance
    2) better intonation through the octaves
    3) less work
    4) no search for the holy grail because I am happy!
    Most all of my trumpet playing colleagues that I regularly play with have switched to Monette mouthpieces. Some have bought them used from Thompson music with good results. The results in our section playing are very positive.
    Hope that this is helpful!
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It is always disappointing to read this type of trash. It would be interesting to find out where this persons information came from. I suspect they forgot to flush the toilet and found it there..............

    Dave Monette did not try to build a "darker" sounding horn. His published goal was to offer musicians more "color" than previously available in mass produced horns. His Chicago model horns(including the one that he made for Bud Herseth) were not 470 bore or especially heavy. Models with this "moderate" weight are still in production today (Prana1)! There were enough "other brands with "large" bores including the orchestra STANDARD Bach Bb and C trumpets. I do not recall Phil Smith in New York running out of air. My Bach 239/25H L did not cause my lungs to collapse either.
    In the past couple of years, Dave has in fact added extra light instruments to the range offered. The customer response has been fantastic.

    As far as the price goes: he has been building horns since the mid 80s and the serial numbers are around 2500. If you look at the website, count the employees, see how often the crew travels to LISTEN to their clients, check the equipment needed to build the stuff and accept the fact that somebody with brilliant ideas should be able to make some money, you quickly realize that the prices are not that ridiculous. Once you own one, you realize that it is worth every cent that you paid for it. The resale value also proves that it is a good investment! Check out Thompson Music. They semm to have the biggest selection of used horns.
     
  5. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Dean Comley called me last night. (Monette MP maker and the guy that calls people who shows an interest in monette horns). He says very very good things about the Maynard Ferguson Horn. The public relations involved with this company is amazing. I never had a guy call me right from the shop just to "talk trumpet". He told me that based on the survey I submitted that I would be better suited to their lightest trumpet, the Maynard Ferguson Prana. (He told me not to let the name throw me off). Apparently these horns are very versatile. The only thing I see myself having toruble with is getting used to the mouth pieces. I love my GR 66 (Chase Sanborn).

    He says that these horns start around $9100. (woa!) Its a good thing that the military will be buying me a horn ;-)

    Cheers
    Eric
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
    The Canadian military needs money for bunker fuel, replacement ships, airplanes, helicopters and who-knows-what-else! Wonder where a Monette trumpet stands on their priority list? (Perhaps Procurement at H.Q. can provide sufficient information so that Parliament can debate it ad nauseum and the CBC can "come into possession of secret briefing papers and then reveal said information to the great Canadian public thus triggering yet another election!)



    ps... if I sound sarcastic, it has nothing to do with Monette trumpets but rather our stupid system for (under)funding our military; something that seems to have it's roots in antiquity!
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Tootsall,
    I think that Monette is one of the few trumpets that qualify for procurement - because the name is at least bilingual if not more than 50% FRENCH!
     
  8. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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  9. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Oooo.... nice one, Rowuk. But if I may suggest, that line of thinking is probably beyond the mental capacity of most, if not all, of our politicians!:lol: (Although we do have one Senator... Tommy Banks... who is/was a professional musician and GREAT band leader).

    Eric... if they'll buy you a Monette then who the heck am I to argue against it? (unless the offer is for a total dollar value in which case I'd argue that two Eclipses are better than one Monette... but I'm biased!)
     
  10. Principaltrumpet

    Principaltrumpet Pianissimo User

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    Here is a question. Monette C Trumpet in Raw Brass
    Why would someone pay 3150.00 for this horn. I have played 4 monettes and absolutly love them. I plan on placing an order with in the next year. The condition of this horn is not good. Creased bell, big dents, and the valves seem out of line. Can someone plese explain to me why this monette would be a better investment than purchasing a New yamaha, bach, or other pro model horn for a much lower price?
    Joshua Ritchie
    P.S. I have worked with Mike before and he is a great guy. It has nothing to do with him. I just dont understand the benifit of buying a horn like this from anyone.
     

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