Money

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jude, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Thank you! At least the basic premise is sound, it seems (that is, it can be fun).

    Don't worry, all I plan to do is make this single suggestion - no pressure, I promise. There's enough on kids these days as it is.

    Jude
     
  2. Dustin

    Dustin Pianissimo User

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    Jun 19, 2006
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    I was in a similar situation through middle school and high school. I played football and played trumpet. By my freshman year, I had to come to a decision between football and marching band, and I decided that I would rather play trumpet. As I grew into an older, wiser young adult, I realized that I made the right decision (Not so much about marching band...the older, wiser young adult also told me that marching band sucked.[opinion]). Playing trumpet has gotten me into college for practically nothing, and a lot of really close friends. But in the end, he has to make the choice for himself. Music isn't for everyone, but neither is baseball. You shouldn't pressure him too much, but it's okay to give him your opinion and if he's interested, guide him to a private teacher or something that will make music more fun for him.
     
  3. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    +1
     
  4. LLD

    LLD New Friend

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    Oct 18, 2007
    Playing in a band with some friends is really a great experience, have more fun and get more practice making up songs than dealing with all the immature students who just complain and make fun.

    /HS senior
    //diversify! you can do sports and band.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not sure that I understand the problem. We have talked about the school and the parents, but what does the kid REALLY want to do?

    The fact that he got the NEW bari sax shows that issues with the band director are probably one sided. With the amount of info here, I think the problem is more puberty than sports vs music. I am not sure if there is an easy way to "save this musician" unless there is a good looking clarinet player available.............
     
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  6. Matt o-iii<O

    Matt o-iii<O Pianissimo User

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    Dec 25, 2007
    Melbourne, Australia
    In my early high school years (about five years ago) I had lost all motivation and was on the verge of giving up music completely.
    What I would suggest (what worked for me) was to hear whats possible
    on the instrument.
    Seek out recordings of great saxophonists and show him whats possible on the instrument, this can have an amazing effect on a student, instilling them with a lust to get better and better.
    In my case it's propelling me at this stage to a career in music.
    Having said that, it is his choice and you can't force him into music if he's not interested. All you can do is show him the possibilities and hope it inspires him.
     
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  7. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Part of the problem here was a bad choice of title for the thread. (The "money" angle would be for his parents.) The idea is the kid plays well but doesn't want to continue in band because of who-knows-what (I know he doesn't want to march, for one thing).

    I was casting about trying to think of some way to persuade him to continue playing without being in the school band - starting one of his own with some friends seemed like one possibility. Some of the kids who responded here said they had done it and enjoyed it, so it doesn't seem like such an impossible idea. I can't see encouraging him to sit in his room and play alone for years on end, even if he were as crazy about music as he is about baseball. If this doesn't work, I'll just "find" him an electric guitar - these are impossibly cool, I understand, and some of his friends already play.

    But I like the picture better of the rest of the band coming out to perform during ball games and Connor trotting off the mound to pick up his sax during the 8th inning to solo on Sweet Caroline. At least it might unnerve the other team.
     
  8. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Do you remember why you started listening? Did somebody suggest it, or were you looking for a way to remotivate yourself? (I'm a comeback player, and the first thing my teacher told me to do during the first lesson was to start listening to the greats on YouTube. And he checks up on whether I have been. Smart guy.)

    Don't worry, I have no intention of trying to force my nephew to do anything. I especially wouldn't want to take the chance of turning him against music entirely. I'd just like to see him keep his options open. You know, in case the pitching doesn't work out.
     
  9. TisEkard

    TisEkard Pianissimo User

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    Jul 28, 2006
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    Give the kid some steroids and have him pitch for the Red Sox. If he is in it for the money than I would not recommend him starting a band. Just go on myspace and look at all the struggling bands. Then turn on the radio and listen to all the people that do make it. Hear anything good?
     
  10. Matt o-iii<O

    Matt o-iii<O Pianissimo User

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    Dec 25, 2007
    Melbourne, Australia
    Jude: Do you remember why you started listening? Did somebody suggest it, or were you looking for a way to remotivate yourself?

    It was completely accidental, but what a fortunate accident:
    At the time I was listening to people like John farnham (Australian rock icon)
    on one of his pieces there was a trumpet solo which just astounded me,
    I had never thought anything remotely like that was possible on the trumpet,
    I then sought out James morrison albums finding "Scream Machine" first which is (as the title suggests) mostly high notes I listened to nothing but that album for 6 months while trying to get similar sounds out of my horn, the album book mentioned Dizzy Gillespie so I sought out his albums and now (five years on) I have a
    jazz collection of around 300 albums and can't put the horn down or leave the house without it.
    James Morrison also inspired me in my quest to be a muti instrumentalist
    (I currently play pretty much any brass instrument thats needed in the bands I'm in ( or can get my hands on)
    But mainly Trumpet, Trombone and Eupho.
    It's really amazing what hearing the possibilities of your instrument can do for you.
     

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