Monthly excercise routine schedules.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Nov 8, 2010.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Has anyone given any thought to monthly schedules for doing excersises.

    It seems like there are to many excercises to do in an hour or two every day.

    So drawing from body building or weight training, where they have monthly cycles of excersies, is there an equivalent set of routines to practise each day?

    Today we do intervals, tomorrow we do double tonguing, etc ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010
  2. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Thanks! That is very close to what I was thinking about.

    Time to get out the stop watch, metronome, tuner and spread sheet.

    I guess I was thinking that I would probably give focus to one of the sections (air flow, scales, fundamentals, intonation exercises) (etudes) and focus on the band music each day, but spread out over a week.

    Air Flow Study
    Scales
    Fundamentals
    Technical Etude
    Lyrical Etude
    Multiple Tonguing
    Band/Orchestra Music
    Listen to Recordings
    Intonation Exercises
     
  4. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    DarkKnight, thanks! That looks cool, so I downloaded it.
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    So if I wanted to cycle those exercises (like weight lifters working up to their max once month), would I do something like metronome speeds, say each day increase the BPM then on the last day just see how fast I can go, then go back and start over?

    Maybe with the high notes, start low then each day go up a half step, then on the last day see how high I can play before going back?
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    On the end of page 17 - I wonder if any of the "shallow" mpc crowd caught that:
    they don't recommend switching to a ("shallow high note mpc") -- but rather have the player switch to a LOWER part.

    this is an exercise routine -- that starts out with (Playing the scales in 3 Octaves) apparently on a regular "symphonic" mpc.

    just pointing out that NOT everyone agrees with the necessity of changing mpc's for high range ---but rather "build" yourself to play with what you have.
     
  7. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    I never advocate changing mouthpieces for attaining range,. and few if any of the people I have ever played with ever thought that way.

    It's for ease, endurance, and sound.

    I have always been able to play higher on deeper pieces, but I have to work twice as hard to cannot get the commercial sound I want with them.
     
  8. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    First, let me say that I am not an expert. When it comes to practice. Only play an exercise at a speed you can accomplish it without making mistakes. Increasing speed before you can play a piece without mistakes will only perfects your ability to make mistakes. Do not attempt to increase your range by trying to hit high notes day-after-day. A very gradual progression outlined in a study book will do the trick. Your range will indeed increase naturally. To paraphrase and idea from Pops, this will ensure you can "play higher notes" within a song and not just "hit higher notes" like you were performing a 1-rep maximum lift.

    I highly recommend Claude Gordon's "Physical Approach to Elementary Brass Playing" or the Rubank's "Elementary Method" for a highly systematized approach to practice that outlines all the things that you need to do. Don E. Johnson's "A comprehensive Practice Approach for the Aspiring Brass Player" is probably my favorite. Micheal Sach's "Daily Fundementals for the Trumpet" is also a real gem that I am usuing.

    Best Wishes,

    DK
     
  9. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    DK, I think that was the idea, find the maximum work out below that for a long time, find the max again and recalibrate.

    Are Clark's Etudes very musical? It looks like one would need both Gordon's and Clark's books. I don't know if Gordon's school of trumpet playing is the one that I subscribe too. The wiki said he was an upper lip 2/3's in guy.
     
  10. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Don't worry about his, or anybody's recommendation for lip placement. They are all different. What is important is the natural progression that they use in their books. The embrochure muscles can not be trained "exactly" like other muscles, although there are a number of similarities and analogies that work. For example, you really can't find out what your maximum is then train at a certain percentage of the maximum for a while then recalibrate based on finding a new maximum at some time in the future.

    Based on your question and where I see you head space. I would really recommend either the Rubank Elementary Method which lays out all of the exercises. It is as if a trainer actually wrote a program of all the things you are supposed to do. Claude Gordon's Physical Approach to Elementary Brass Playing is really a super. If you do not have a teacher, you will really need to get one. In these days with skype, you can take lessons over the Internet with a number of qualified people.

    Best Wishes,

    DK
     

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