More practice= worse playing?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamba21500, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Good playing needs things that our brain can translate into future actions. Predictable muscle activity with things like long tones and lipslurs gives our brains an easy target. I can't stress the concept enough.
     
    turtlejimmy likes this.
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Practice is boring, until we learn to work through it. Just as an airplane needs to break the sound barrier to fly faster than the speed of sound, we need to break through the "boredom barrier." An interesting read: Today's Good News :: Boring Religion ::

    In other words, keep plugging away and wait for the miracle.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It doesn't get any simpler than this. The only thing I can add is give yourself plenty of breath support from below, your abdomin, the seventh schacra. This will provide pressure support from the lowest recesses of your lung. The relax. Just relax, and the air will flow freely into your horn to play THROUGH those long tones and lip slurs. Now turn off the TV, go into a sterile room without distractions, and work on these concepts.
     
  4. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    Practice is boring? I love to practice... The only problem I have with practice is finding the time in the day or finding enough time to practice...

    But I also have a few days / times set aside that are pre-scheduled practice times and then if I can practice more its a bonus.

    Maybe the key is to have goals of what you are working on so that you have a focus during practice sessions... I'm sure if I have a written out practice routine that never changed I would be bored as hell too. :-)
     
  5. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    Let's face it. It's your new practice studio. Maybe you send this guy the plans. It least he should wade through the pages and pages of the design and developent that happened here. Seriously you are dedicated enough to do what was said by Rowuk. You started with a concern for the neighbors that would not alow you to play naturally so you created an enviornment where NOTHING was in the way of you playing, listening and adjusting your tone.
    BTW I counted up the practice time. Do you all practice for 2 solid hours a a time?
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    VB is not saying this. You did not complete his sentence: Practice is boring, UNTIL WE LEART TO WORK THROUGH IT. This is such a vital concept. This is what make practice work. Without it, practice is in the words of the great Rowuk, brainless. And when it becomes a brainless act, we no longer learn, develop and progress.

    Practice makes perfect, but nobody's perfect, so way practice? The answer is so we are ALWAYS striving toward perfection. We never get there, so we keep trying. If you think you are there, then you stop trying and the rest of the world will pass you by in ability.
     
  7. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    This comment above on the new state of the art practice studio was directed to the "Turtle". Dummy me, forgot to do a quote
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Pat,

    It's the nature of a turtle to plow straight ahead .... if there's a large rock, turtles tend to go over it ....

    You are right. I'm not letting anything in the way of developing my tone. Already, in the Turtle Shed, I'm playing louder and more freely. That's a key part of Rowuk's long tone advice ... that it is a relaxed, free blowing process. In the last months, I've been working so hard and steadily to learn to play SOFTLY, at very low volumes, that my acoustic steel string guitar was louder than the trumpet when I first started playing in The Shed. That's just wrong. No mere wooden thing should ever be able to match the volume of a TRUMPET. :dontknow:


    Turtle
     
  9. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    The most help I ever had in learning to play was a book by Mark VanCleave. His sugestions on practicing were invaluable. One of them was to do the opposite of what most players do. Practice tones Low-loud and high-soft not the other way around. I find the low tones limber the lip, the high ones give me more control. Some of his other admonitions were to have fun doing it and don't drive yourself by trying to keep practicing when you are tired. That is why I practice in 15-20 minute stints. I work a 6 day week all day and I am 73 years old so it seemed like a good idea for me
     
  10. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    @Vulgano: I don't find practicing boring at all, and it's a great way for me to get away from school work, but without the mindlessness of television or gaming, until the quality of my playing puts me in a bad mood.

    @gmonady: After speaking to my teacher, I believe that relaxing is a key issue in my playing, I think to hard about the note whereas I should be focusing on the music.

    @PatMurphy: It's an hour forty, but split up into 30 minutes when I come home from school, 30 minutes before or after dinner/tea, and 40 minutes later that evening around 8. When I play long tones or lip slurs, I play more quietly as I ascend, like suggested in the Schlossberg book.

    Thank you all for your input, I think I'll really benefit from what has been said here.
     

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