More practice= worse playing?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamba21500, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Magic. Hmmm, never heard our Skyline Chili described that way. As for the beer, perhaps it was Tree Frog Beer, a well known beer in Cincinnati who's motto is: "Doesn't taste like much, but it gets you there... Ribbbit!"
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    By the way Ted, speaking of Tree Frogs. Do you know how to tell the difference between a frog and a horny toad? A frog says: "Ribbittt, Ribittt". A horny toad says: "Rubbbittt, Rubbbitt".

    Just making sure you are drinking the right beer while in Cincinnati, and if not, it will require more practice. Will this practice lead to worse playing? Remember, it doesn't taste like much, but it gets you there.

    Oh, and everybody that is thanking the good doctor for this amazing biology lesson, all I can say is: You're Welcome; and maybe, May I have another?
     
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  3. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    At 73 I too am a bit "experienced". Since I work a full 40-50 hour week my time is limited and I can not read.
    My practice routine is PLAY MUSIC. I stand up and play in club jam sessions almost every week. I HATE! Making a fool of myself so..
    I make sure I am prepared. I try never to miss a day especially within 48 hours of playing. I will do 15 minutes 1st thing in the morning. Then 15-20 minutes 2 times later in the day. Buzz the moughpiece on the way to the gig. I am constantly listening to my tone! My normal range will kick in after about 5-10 minutes. No biggie. C above the staff is more than enough for me to work with. Tone, feeling, dynamics is what I concentrate on. Playing as soft and as high as you can is good practice. Full round, loud low notes get my chop in tune.
    Just about every breath I take the mpc off my lip. Keeping it on there for minutes tears it up. Short on and offs make it stronger each time.
    At a jam I am at an advantage in that I only play what I can do well. 100 notes to the measure I cannot do and do not even want to. "Cry me a river" , masquerade" with lots of dymanics and note bending gets the crowd into it. Big full notes with lots of emotion does it for me and them.
    BTW the breathing tips mentioned here were very helpful. I was doing it naturally but now I now what I am watching for. I know that my throat is open even after playing for hours. My practice is have fun and play real music that I enjoy
     
  4. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    One last comment o the breathing tips. Breathing in and imediately blowing with no pause, keeps your throat from closing. Not only helps to have a big trumpet sound but is a BIG help when you have to address large groups for an extended time. You project much better and your voice is fuller with no sore throat. At leat that is how it is for me.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Pat, when you make a statement like "I cannot read", the hair on the back of my head (where I'm sure I have some still) tingles. I paused and realized that you referred only to music, since you've been reading this forum. That said, in a manner I envy anyone with the ear who can play by just what they hear. I can do it some, but I find it extremely difficult.

    But reading music I find easier than the English Language. first with only 7 letters instead of 26 ... just A thru G as are repeated over and over again from way down in the bass clef up through the treble clef, in a sequence of alternating line and space. Really, I think the first obstacle comes with the key signature and the question of what key are we playing in. Honestly, that never has been a problem for me to know what key as all I needed to know was how many sharps or flats on trumpet music (or any other instrument music). That's where the confusion for me started when the instructor or conductor stated that the music was in the key of X. It was my Mother who played and tutored piano to explain that such was known as the concert key or the music for a C instrument and it was necessary to transpose such for many other instruments and went further to explain to me that the third space C for her would be a fourth line D for me on my Bb trumpet, viz two half steps (semi-tones) higher. It was at this point I went rampant, whereas I had no problem with the time signature (tempo) and started reading all her piano music with instant transposition in my mind to the Bb trumpet. Later, I could rip parts for a 2nd and 3rd trumpet from the same piano music. Yeah, I can now look at a chart on my wall for the names of all the articulation and other symbols, but moreso I now know how each is played. Don't worry about a 100 notes to a measure because there isn't any music written as such. I see a 1/64 note (4 flags) in the training manuals but I've yet to see one in any of my music and for sure I wouldn't be able to play one, and yet I don't consider myself a slouch now for speed of fingering.

    Summary: work at it slow at first and then increase the speed to the moment that it sounds right. The hardest song I ever had to play was Bye Bye Birdie, and I didn't get it right until I learned some Israeli music.
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Hmmmmmm...

    If more practice = worse playing, is the inverse also true, less practice = better playing? If so, I may stop practicing all together. In a couple years, I could possibly rival the trumpet greats. I guess it's worth a try, because I'm sure not getting there by practicing...:lol:
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Dale, My just reading all your posts makes the above seem funny to me. Somehow I don't believe you are attempting to rival anyone, but just to be yourself and enjoy playing these brass beasts as well as you can. That said, that's all I want to do also. I do not want to rival anyone or even sound like them. Just because I prefer a HJ Parduba mpc and think Harry James was a great trumpeter, doesn't mean I want to be like him now ... he's dead, and though I have major health issues I'm not attempting to be the same anytime soon. Many other greats have passed away also.

    First, I know to become recognized as a great trumpeter takes more than either talent or education, it requires the management of others and the production of composers, arrangers, orchestration and promotion, all cost expenses as must be capitalized. Sure doesn't hurt if the performer is good looking also, and it is this last as now eliminates me.
     
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  9. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    For me I think there are exercises that I will never master, so better left to the professionals that have time to practice 29 hours a day. Glissandos(bends), lip trills, double tonguing and extreme range are all like this. Better for me to keep it simple work on dynamics, tone, intervals, those few high notes I need for the song and just learning new songs. Better to sound good than to kill yourself.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I know of no one that practices 29 hours a day, the latter as includes daylight and night time. The difference between an amateur and a professional musician I recently was told: " ... an amateur practices and a professional rehearses ...".
     

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