Most copied trumpet?

Discussion in 'Horns' started by wimbouman, Oct 8, 2005.

  1. wimbouman

    wimbouman New Friend

    Hi guys!

    Just curious...

    What would be the worlds most copied instrument?
    The Bach Strad 37? Schilke B? Meha?

    Any thoughts?

    Grtz,

    Wim
     
  2. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    Monette
     
  3. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    Nov 5, 2003
    Dubai, UAE
    The original pre-WWII Frederick (sp) Besson trumpets.

    Regards,

    Trevor
     
  4. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

    Age:
    35
    1,884
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    Mar 22, 2005
    Boston
    Not sure if there's a clear answer, but I've seen a lot of piccs and E-flats that look a lot like Schilkes...
    -jimi
     
  5. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
    The first Perinet-valved trumpets were long, narrow bore "pea shooters" with a very bright, almost vulgar sound . . . and most orchestras used cornets!

    Then, the wrap of the original F. Besson (of about 100 years ago) finally gave us a more rich and noble trumpet sound.

    Although there are a very few trumpets today that are not derived from the F. Besson wrap, they are quite rare.

    Vincent Bach was the first custom maker to clone a "Super Besson" in around 1924! Bach was a frustrated symphony trumpeter looking for a F. Besson (the brand he played) that didn't have leaky valves and other inconsistencies notorious on early F. Besson trumpets. Bach definately succeeded in making the first "Super Besson!"

    About 15 years later ('39) Eldon Benge, of the Chicago Symphony, started making his own "Super Besson" . . . and one that was closer design-wise than the Bach. Like Bach, Mr. Benge only made a couple of horns a week . . . and also special order for specific musicians. He also succeeded, and many feel we'd all be playing BENGES today if Eldon hadn't tragically died only blocks from his home in an auto accident in 1960.


    In '57 along came Mr. Schilke to make his own derivation of the famous Besson "wrap." He preferred different variations in leadpipe/tuning slide design but his horns were definately also variations of the Besson.

    Today, virtually all the popular trumpets are made on a variation of the F. Besson wrap . . . with only rare exceptions.

    No other design has influenced trumpets like the balky old F. Besson with that wonderful F. Besson/Bach/Benge/et al "sound!"

    Sincerely,

    Tom Turner
     
  6. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
    Besson

    Schilke Piccolo P5-4
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Wow, what a question!

    What comes to mind is Besson before about 1945 and then Monette after about, what? 1986 or so?

    ML
     
  8. uatrmpt

    uatrmpt Piano User

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    AL
    While I think that the French Besson is the most important horn that has been copied, I think that the Bach ML 37 has the most copied designs around now. Most people have making a Bach clone as their intent, not a Besson clone. (Zeus, B&S, Yamaha, all the music store brands, some Kanstuls, etc.)
     
  9. sinfoniantrumpeter

    sinfoniantrumpeter Pianissimo User

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    Apr 10, 2005
    what horns are copies of monettes?
     
  10. uatrmpt

    uatrmpt Piano User

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    Nov 29, 2003
    AL
    The Getzen Genesis, Edwards Gen X and III, Taylors, and the Courtois are all influence by Monette, but there are other things too. Heavy bottom valve caps and tops, heavy blank mouthpieces. I'm sure there are a few more.
     

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