mouthpiece gap.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by street, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. street

    street New Friend

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    May 31, 2012
    I just got a new mouthpiece that bottoms out on my leadpipe. Can I adjust the gap by sanding-grinding small increments off the mouthpiece shank?? for ex, if I grind off one eighth inch would my gap then be .125??

    thanks
     
  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Perhaps, depending on the mouthpiece. Sometimes it's better to adjust the horn. What mouthpiece and what horn?

    Tom
     
  3. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    If your mouthpiece already bottoms out, you probably have a negative gap. Zero gap is when the mouthpiece just touches the end of the lead pipe when it is inserted firmly (i.e. doesn't fall out when the trumpet is tipped up). Once you have zero gap, then taking 0.125" off the end of the lead pipe (down inside the receiver) or the end of the mouthpiece shank will give you 0.125" gap.
     
  4. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    I'd let a pro do it! But it can be done.
     
  5. street

    street New Friend

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    May 31, 2012
    thanks. The mouthpiece is a Bach. I have other bach mps that fit properly. I had a schilke mp that bottomed out like that and I ground enough of to make it a gap of 1/8 th. I rarely use that mp but was concerned if it would change the characteristics of the mp.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Yes it will change the characteristics of the mouthpiece. You are removing part of the backbore. The change may or may not be an improvement. You may or may not notice it. The benefit of a decent gap may or may not outweigh any negative characteristics from the change to the backbore.

    This is the exciting thing about trumpet design and modification! There is no computer model to accurately predict any of this stuff! I was talking with an aircraft designer last week who is shocked by the "black art" of trumpet making.
     
  7. street

    street New Friend

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    May 31, 2012
    I did it. built a jig to hold the mouthpiece square to the disk sander and was able to easily sand off a little more than a 16th. It now seats well, plays well and has a gap of less than an 8th of an inch. I haven't accurately measured the gap yet, but am happy with the way it plays.
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    As an Aircraft MAINTENANCE Engineer (not a designer) I rejoice that the "black arts" still exist. We find that as the designers thoughts are cut into metal and become more or less a successful airplane, that the airplane will age 'away' from the design. It's then that the Maintainers skill in the "black Arts" you alude to come into play - and we maintain the airplane back to the design. The trumpet designers "black arts" usually take the end user into account, the maintainers viewpoint on an aircraft (well CERTAIN manufacturers anyhow) is often subjugated. A good Maintainer is worth the price of his/her wand - good design is priceless.
     

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